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There are always the re-reads!  I got to the end of AMoL and went right back to the beginning of the series (New Spring) the day after :D

 

I would also suggest Robin Hobb/Megan Lindholm books:

-The Realm of the Elderlings is her best stuff (imo), and includes several series: The Farseer Trilogy, Liveship Traders Trilogy, the Tawny Man Trilogy, and the Rain Wilds Chronicles.

-The Ki and Vandien Quartet is also worth a read, but not quite as immersive

 

Katherine Kerr's Deverry Cycle has a very deep and rich world with a fascinating depth of history and mythology.  It is broken into four acts, each with three of four books:

- Deverry

- The Westlands (my favourite)

- The Dragon Mage

- The Silver Wyrm

You can kind of read them in any order because the characters reappear and are reincarnated, and the different times are all mixed up in the various books.

 

And if you are looking for a long series, Anne McCaffrey's Dragon Riders of Pern is pretty epic with more than 20 books!

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This has been moved from the Wheel of Time book discussion, as it seems to fit better here.

 

But would also second the Robin Hobb recommendation, although I think that the Rain Wild series is a little weaker than the other 3.

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I've had a break of two months because I didn't feel like reading any fantasy at all, and not even coming here. It wasn't that I was disappointed with aMoL (although there's a couple of things I won't forgive Brandon for), but it was a thing in my life that had been going on for 17 years and.. well, "what now" for me was to get it completely off my mind for a while. 

 

I will check back for recommendations, and considering how much I love WoT, I'd be happy to get some pointers as to how these book compare. Its not that anything has to be just like WoT but its a good benchmark.

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I've had a break of two months because I didn't feel like reading any fantasy at all, and not even coming here. It wasn't that I was disappointed with aMoL (although there's a couple of things I won't forgive Brandon for), but it was a thing in my life that had been going on for 17 years and.. well, "what now" for me was to get it completely off my mind for a while. 

 

I will check back for recommendations, and considering how much I love WoT, I'd be happy to get some pointers as to how these book compare. Its not that anything has to be just like WoT but its a good benchmark.

 

What things about the way Sanderson wrote A Memory Of Light did you not like? I'm curious.  Personally, it took me a while to get used to the way he wrote Matrim Cauthon.

Edited by rodonalwitz

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please remember that discussing any stuff from MoL is restricted to the MoL boards or PMs :wink:

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I've had a break of two months because I didn't feel like reading any fantasy at all, and not even coming here. It wasn't that I was disappointed with aMoL (although there's a couple of things I won't forgive Brandon for), but it was a thing in my life that had been going on for 17 years and.. well, "what now" for me was to get it completely off my mind for a while.

 

I will check back for recommendations, and considering how much I love WoT, I'd be happy to get some pointers as to how these book compare. Its not that anything has to be just like WoT but its a good benchmark.

What things about the way Sanderson wrote A Memory Of Light did you not like? I'm curious. Personally, it took me a while to get used to the way he wrote Matrim Cauthon.

Check out the. "Quality Thread" on the AMoL board. Pretty good summary there.

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if i had to recomend an author that dedicates as much time to his work as RJ did, i'd recomend Patrick Rothfuss. started reading him about a year back and had as much trouble putting down his books as i did RJ's.

Edited by VoidRaven

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Emberverse saga. S.M Sterling. Read book one and I'm hooked. Several wot and AoIaF refrences to.

 

The First Law triology is awesome to.

 

Anything Asimov (Empire, Robots, and Foundation series, about 3-6 books each and inter connected series/universe.

 

Dune series.

 

And if your looking for non fantasy really quick reads, but good non the less, check out the Dirk Pitt, series by Clive Cussler. Not a literary Genius, but he knows how to get you hanging off the edge of your seat. (Hell the mans nearly 90, still writing 3-4 books a Year!

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If you are looking to read epic fantasy which is every bit as epic and ambitious as the WoT, then with my highest recommendations, I urge you to read Steven Erickson's, Malazan Books of the Fallen series. The first book starts out relatively confusing, as compared to first books in other fantasy series. However, I promise you that if you stick with it, by the time you finish the first book, Gardens of the Moon, that you will have enjoyed the first book and be wanting to read more of this series. 

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The absolute top-tier fantasy authors around at the moment:

 

George R.R. Martin

Known for his Song of Ice and Fire series (the basis for the Game of Thrones TV series on HBO), which starts with A Game of Thrones. Easily the most significant and popular epic fantasy series since Tolkien. He's also notable for his long-running Wild Cards superhero series (co-written with many other writers) and several significant stand-alone novels, most famously Fevre Dream, the greatest modern vampire novel. His Dreamsongs short story collection is also essential.

 

Terry Pratchett

A fantasy author often described as simply a writer of funny novels, although in reality his book are much deeper than that. Whilst funny, they are also strongly focused on characterisation and scoring thematic points, as well as satirising real-life elements. Most of his novels take place on the Discworld, though this is not an ongoing series but simply a common background setting for many stand-alone novels (though often with recurring characters). The Colour of Magic is the first book, but not a good place to start, as it's one of the weaker novels. I recommend Guards! Guards! as the best entry-point to the series.

 

Steven Erikson

The writer of the Malazan Book of the Fallen series, which currently encompasses a completed ten-volume series, a number of short stories and a prequel trilogy (Book 2 of which is out in January), plus six additional and very decent novels written by his collaborator Ian Cameron Esslemont. The first book is Gardens of the Moon. The series is much more diffuse than Wheel of Time, with the action unfolding across half a dozen different continents with several completely separate casts of characters. Vast in scope and difficult to get into, but it rewards the effort.

 

Guy Gavriel Kay

An author who mixes fantasy and historical fiction. Unlike most authors mentioned here, he mostly concentrates on stand-alone novels: Tigana, A Song for Arbonne, The Lions of Al-Rassan, The Last Light of the Sun, Under Heaven and River of Stars. He also has a trilogy called The Fionavar Tapestry, which is much less accomplished (it was his opening work, and very traditional) and a thoughtful and interesting duology called The Sarantine Mosaic. He's also more focused on the 'lighter' side of things than a lot of modern fantasy novelists: though cynical, his books generally have more hopeful endings.

 

R. Scott Bakker

The author of two interlinked trilogies, The Prince of Nothing and The Aspect-Emperor. His first book is The Darkness That Comes Before. He is very, very dark. His books make A Song of Ice and Fire read like a My Little Pony series. He's heavily influenced by real history, Tolkien and Frank Herbert of Dune fame (his series is basically The Lord of the Rings as rewritten by Herbert). Extremely intelligent and thought-provoking, but also bleak to the occasional point of nihilism.

 

J.V. Jones

A robustly entertaining author, known for her opening Book of Words trilogy, which is traditional and a bit predictable but still enjoyable, and the vastly superior Sword of Shadows series (starts with A Cavern of Black Ice) which, although a sequel, is designed to also be read alone.

 

K.J. Parker

Another somewhat more cynical author, but also one known for her entertaining sense of humour and wry observations on the futility and stupidity of governments and organisations. She has many books which vary a bit in tone: The Fencer Trilogy (starts with Colours in the Steel) opens as a traditional, 'defending the city from the invading horde' story but goes off into something much more metaphysical and oddball. Sharps is much funnier and has something of a happy ending. The Folding Knife is probably her single best novel, with a well-constructed structure and some good storytelling. The Company and The Hammer are darker, bloodier and more cynical, but are also quite good stand-alones.

 

Joe Abercrombie

The 'funnier George R.R. Martin', known for his well-constructed characters, black humour and use of non-traditional fantasy influences (such as Westerns and war movies). His First Law Trilogy (starts with The Blade Itself) is very good, and he's followed that up with three semi-stand-alone novels: Best Served Cold, The Heroes and Red Country. Next up is a new trilogy in the same world.

 

Scott Lynch

A lighter and funnier author than most of the above - though still brutal when the story needs it - who is writing a series of books about a back-alley thief who inadvertently gets involved in the continent-spanning machinations of a cult of powerful wizards. The Lies of Locke Lamora and Red Seas Under Red Skies are both excellent, and the much-delayed third volume is out in October.

 

Daniel Abraham

The heir apparent to George R.R. Martin, whom he has frequently collaborated with, Abraham is best-known for his completed, lyrical and tragic Long Price Quartet (which starts with A Shadow in Summer). His current series, The Dagger and the Coin (starts with The Dragon's Path; Book 3 is out imminently) is more traditional but a lot of fun. He also writes urban fantasy under the name M.L.N. Hanover and SF under the name James S.A. Corey.

 

Chris Wooding

His Tales of the Ketty Jay (starts with Retribution Falls) series is excellent. This is a mixture of traditional fantasy, steampunk and more than a dash of Firefly. If you want something completely different to WoT, I'd go for this series. Lots of fun, and also almost complete (the fourth and final novel is out in August).

 

China Mieville

If you want something very different and a bit weirder and denser, Mieville is worth a look. His novels are oddball, featuring a mixture of magic and technology and featuring weird creatures and strange monsters. His YA novels, Un Lun Dun and Railsea, the best starting points. The City and the City, a detective novel with a twist, is also highly reccomended. His three signature novels are set in the world of Bas-Lag, though they are all independent of one another: Perdido Street Station (his most famous novel), The Scar (his best) and Iron Council (his most political, though not preachy) are all excellent.

 

Certainly not in the top tier, but might be worth a look:

 

Patrick Rothfuss

The Name of the Wind and The Wise Man's Fear are entertaining novels, but also far too long considering the very slight story they are telling. Having said that, if you are a WoT fan then you'll be used to reading 800-page novels where the story doesn't move very much ;)

 

Robin Hobb

An interesting author whose opening novels are always excellent: Assassin's Apprentice (The Farseer Trilogy) and Ship of Magic (The Liveship Traders) are particularly sublime. Unfortunately, she tends to go off the boil as each of her trilogies continues and she ends up writing hundreds upon hundreds of pages in which nothing at all happens. Her characters are very good, but she lacks discipline and conciseness.

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Just could not get into Erikson's Malazan books...tried, boy did I try, but halfway thru the third book I gave up. Just got too complicated and, well, too weird.

 

Agree with Sanderson's Mistborn series (and I'd suggest his elantris too) and Zelazny's Chronicles of Amber suggestions. Also like Terry Brooks though perhaps for the younger crowd (read most of them over 10 years ago).

 

Something a bit different you might consider is Carlos Ruiz Zafon's "Shadow in the Wind". Not really classified as 'fantasy', but, well, you'll see what I mean if you read it. It's a bunch of genres. You'll see it reviewed on several fantasy websites, and almost always with a 10 out of 10 rating. It's comfortably in my top 5 books that I've read (which now of course includes AMOL).

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The absolute top-tier fantasy authors around at the moment:

 

George R.R. Martin

Known for his Song of Ice and Fire series (the basis for the Game of Thrones TV series on HBO), which starts with A Game of Thrones. Easily the most significant and popular epic fantasy series since Tolkien. He's also notable for his long-running Wild Cards superhero series (co-written with many other writers) and several significant stand-alone novels, most famously Fevre Dream, the greatest modern vampire novel. His Dreamsongs short story collection is also essential.

 

Terry Pratchett

A fantasy author often described as simply a writer of funny novels, although in reality his book are much deeper than that. Whilst funny, they are also strongly focused on characterisation and scoring thematic points, as well as satirising real-life elements. Most of his novels take place on the Discworld, though this is not an ongoing series but simply a common background setting for many stand-alone novels (though often with recurring characters). The Colour of Magic is the first book, but not a good place to start, as it's one of the weaker novels. I recommend Guards! Guards! as the best entry-point to the series.

 

Steven Erikson

The writer of the Malazan Book of the Fallen series, which currently encompasses a completed ten-volume series, a number of short stories and a prequel trilogy (Book 2 of which is out in January), plus six additional and very decent novels written by his collaborator Ian Cameron Esslemont. The first book is Gardens of the Moon. The series is much more diffuse than Wheel of Time, with the action unfolding across half a dozen different continents with several completely separate casts of characters. Vast in scope and difficult to get into, but it rewards the effort.

 

Guy Gavriel Kay

An author who mixes fantasy and historical fiction. Unlike most authors mentioned here, he mostly concentrates on stand-alone novels: Tigana, A Song for Arbonne, The Lions of Al-Rassan, The Last Light of the Sun, Under Heaven and River of Stars. He also has a trilogy called The Fionavar Tapestry, which is much less accomplished (it was his opening work, and very traditional) and a thoughtful and interesting duology called The Sarantine Mosaic. He's also more focused on the 'lighter' side of things than a lot of modern fantasy novelists: though cynical, his books generally have more hopeful endings.

 

R. Scott Bakker

The author of two interlinked trilogies, The Prince of Nothing and The Aspect-Emperor. His first book is The Darkness That Comes Before. He is very, very dark. His books make A Song of Ice and Fire read like a My Little Pony series. He's heavily influenced by real history, Tolkien and Frank Herbert of Dune fame (his series is basically The Lord of the Rings as rewritten by Herbert). Extremely intelligent and thought-provoking, but also bleak to the occasional point of nihilism.

 

J.V. Jones

A robustly entertaining author, known for her opening Book of Words trilogy, which is traditional and a bit predictable but still enjoyable, and the vastly superior Sword of Shadows series (starts with A Cavern of Black Ice) which, although a sequel, is designed to also be read alone.

 

K.J. Parker

Another somewhat more cynical author, but also one known for her entertaining sense of humour and wry observations on the futility and stupidity of governments and organisations. She has many books which vary a bit in tone: The Fencer Trilogy (starts with Colours in the Steel) opens as a traditional, 'defending the city from the invading horde' story but goes off into something much more metaphysical and oddball. Sharps is much funnier and has something of a happy ending. The Folding Knife is probably her single best novel, with a well-constructed structure and some good storytelling. The Company and The Hammer are darker, bloodier and more cynical, but are also quite good stand-alones.

 

Joe Abercrombie

The 'funnier George R.R. Martin', known for his well-constructed characters, black humour and use of non-traditional fantasy influences (such as Westerns and war movies). His First Law Trilogy (starts with The Blade Itself) is very good, and he's followed that up with three semi-stand-alone novels: Best Served Cold, The Heroes and Red Country. Next up is a new trilogy in the same world.

 

Scott Lynch

A lighter and funnier author than most of the above - though still brutal when the story needs it - who is writing a series of books about a back-alley thief who inadvertently gets involved in the continent-spanning machinations of a cult of powerful wizards. The Lies of Locke Lamora and Red Seas Under Red Skies are both excellent, and the much-delayed third volume is out in October.

 

Daniel Abraham

The heir apparent to George R.R. Martin, whom he has frequently collaborated with, Abraham is best-known for his completed, lyrical and tragic Long Price Quartet (which starts with A Shadow in Summer). His current series, The Dagger and the Coin (starts with The Dragon's Path; Book 3 is out imminently) is more traditional but a lot of fun. He also writes urban fantasy under the name M.L.N. Hanover and SF under the name James S.A. Corey.

 

Chris Wooding

His Tales of the Ketty Jay (starts with Retribution Falls) series is excellent. This is a mixture of traditional fantasy, steampunk and more than a dash of Firefly. If you want something completely different to WoT, I'd go for this series. Lots of fun, and also almost complete (the fourth and final novel is out in August).

 

China Mieville

If you want something very different and a bit weirder and denser, Mieville is worth a look. His novels are oddball, featuring a mixture of magic and technology and featuring weird creatures and strange monsters. His YA novels, Un Lun Dun and Railsea, the best starting points. The City and the City, a detective novel with a twist, is also highly reccomended. His three signature novels are set in the world of Bas-Lag, though they are all independent of one another: Perdido Street Station (his most famous novel), The Scar (his best) and Iron Council (his most political, though not preachy) are all excellent.

 

Certainly not in the top tier, but might be worth a look:

 

Patrick Rothfuss

The Name of the Wind and The Wise Man's Fear are entertaining novels, but also far too long considering the very slight story they are telling. Having said that, if you are a WoT fan then you'll be used to reading 800-page novels where the story doesn't move very much ;)

 

Robin Hobb

An interesting author whose opening novels are always excellent: Assassin's Apprentice (The Farseer Trilogy) and Ship of Magic (The Liveship Traders) are particularly sublime. Unfortunately, she tends to go off the boil as each of her trilogies continues and she ends up writing hundreds upon hundreds of pages in which nothing at all happens. Her characters are very good, but she lacks discipline and conciseness.

+1 

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any good cia or spy novels?

 

I read Declare by Tim Powers not long ago, and it was . . . interesting.  It is a spy novel, but with supernatural elements.  I enjoyed reading most of it, but there were certain things that I didn't like about it, and overall I just didn't find it satisfying.  But it might be worth considering.  It definitely has some points in its favor.

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Well considering we're discussing other books to read I hope this is relevant to the topic but I'm looking for the name of the author of the series that I forgot. It's like a toothache and I'm going crazy trying to remember it. Here is the clue:

The author is a woman.

Genre is mixed;urban fantasy,scify with elements of the Fae legends reminiscent of Laurell K. Hamilton without the endless sex.

Set in alternate earth where an experiment into quantum reality tore a gap in space continuum and reality is divided into five elements. These set of realities can be accessed using portals controlled by the world's version of CIA.

The main protagonist is a cyborg woman.

Hope this helps. I really want to know how to find it again but as I forgot the Author, the name of the series and even the name of the main character it's hopeless. I blame my lack of memory on the baby.

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Well considering we're discussing other books to read I hope this is relevant to the topic but I'm looking for the name of the author of the series that I forgot. It's like a toothache and I'm going crazy trying to remember it. Here is the clue:

The author is a woman.

Genre is mixed;urban fantasy,scify with elements of the Fae legends reminiscent of Laurell K. Hamilton without the endless sex.

Set in alternate earth where an experiment into quantum reality tore a gap in space continuum and reality is divided into five elements. These set of realities can be accessed using portals controlled by the world's version of CIA.

The main protagonist is a cyborg woman.

Hope this helps. I really want to know how to find it again but as I forgot the Author, the name of the series and even the name of the main character it's hopeless. I blame my lack of memory on the baby.

 

Sounds fairly interesting as that plot appears to mix up together a few storylines which I have read in other books. I wish that I could help you with your quest. However, I really have no clue as to that series' author or name of that series.

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Find it. It's Robson. Got really bad review which just goes to show that one's treasure is another's rubbish. Still going to get the last book in the series though. Thanks for your help.

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Hey guys!

 

Could any of you suggest works similar to Mistborn or more specifically, similar to "Alloy of Law". I found that a quick entertaining read, after having finished the mammoth WoT re-read and AMoL. What I loved about the mistborn series was the mesh of religion, politics and the metaphysical elements. I also enjoyed the charming conversations between Wax and Wayne, as well as the more modern set of the fourth / stand alone book.

 

Also, could anyone suggest anything in the way of good science fiction as well. I wanted to start reading 'Dune', but it's on loan and I'm not going to be able to start on that for a while.

 

 

Thanks .

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Have you ever read The Passage by Justin Cronin? If not do so. I think it's one of the 50 books you must read before you die list.

 

If you enjoy Dune you might like to try Catherine Asaro's Skolian Saga series. Start with Primary Inversion, Spherical Harmonic or the Triad Chair in the series. There's stand alone novels and short stories in the same story arc as well if you don't want to get fully immerse waiting for Dune.

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Hey guys!

 

Could any of you suggest works similar to Mistborn or more specifically, similar to "Alloy of Law". I found that a quick entertaining read, after having finished the mammoth WoT re-read and AMoL. What I loved about the mistborn series was the mesh of religion, politics and the metaphysical elements. I also enjoyed the charming conversations between Wax and Wayne, as well as the more modern set of the fourth / stand alone book.

 

Also, could anyone suggest anything in the way of good science fiction as well. I wanted to start reading 'Dune', but it's on loan and I'm not going to be able to start on that for a while.

 

 

Thanks .

For fantasy give Felix Gillman and the "Half Made World" a shot. Great prose and very interesting premise. 

 

As for scifi, can't go wrong with Rochard Morgan and the Takeshi Kovacs novels.

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Cheers guys! I'll make sure to check most of those out. Meanwhile, I got impatient and borrowed 'The Way of Kings'. Hope its as good as rest of Brandon's work.

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Hey guys!

 

Could any of you suggest works similar to Mistborn or more specifically, similar to "Alloy of Law". I found that a quick entertaining read, after having finished the mammoth WoT re-read and AMoL. What I loved about the mistborn series was the mesh of religion, politics and the metaphysical elements. I also enjoyed the charming conversations between Wax and Wayne, as well as the more modern set of the fourth / stand alone book.

 

Also, could anyone suggest anything in the way of good science fiction as well. I wanted to start reading 'Dune', but it's on loan and I'm not going to be able to start on that for a while.

 

 

Thanks .

 

I haven't read any of the Mistborn books, but I will say that Dune is a great book.  You may even notice some parallels between Dune and the Wheel of Time.

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Hey guys!

 

Please forgive me for not introducing myself in the appropriate section before asking questions here,

but with a broken hand the writing is slow-going and I desperately need new fodder for my Kindle to pass the time ;-)

 

I just finished WoT a few days ago, and I was completely and utterly absorbed in this series. I finished the whole thing in roughly 3 months.. Just amazing! Thats why I dont want to read just anything now but sth that people with a similar taste also enjoyed.

I am looking for sth with the same scope of WoT. The same level of complexetiy, world building etc., and I want it to be high fantasy.  Before WoT I read and also enjoyed greatly for example: A Song of Ice and Fire, Stephen King's Dark Tower and LOTR. Sword of Truth not as much, but I also liked it.

As a matter of fact, I asked this exact question 4 months ago in the ASOIAF-Board and got for a reply... Wheel of TimE! ;)

 

Thanks for your help :)

 

EDIT:

After plowing through this thread I already have more suggestions than I can stomach, starting with Mistborn to Prince of Nothing, Malazan and Riftwar and so many more...

I still can't decide. What do you think about those 3 series, especially regarding to world building and magic systems?

Edited by Vratyras

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