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Women in the Wheel of Time series


DJP
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Hi. I'm new to this forum and this is my first post, though I've definitely enjoyed reading everyone's comments and ideas.

 

This is hands-down my favorite fantasy series, which I have just recently reread (again) in order to put the events of book 11 into context. Reading all the books in quick succession, however, highlighted something that's been bothering me throughout this entire series - the female characters.

 

Why is just about every female character written as manipulative, controlling, eye-rolling, and so incredibly patronizing toward men (not to mention bitchy as hell towards every other woman)? Don't get me wrong, these qualities certainly suit individual characters and are necessary to the story, but a central theme seems to be women disliking/nagging/controlling men or hating/sniping/struggling for power with each other. More often than not, I find myself wanting to slap just about every female character with dialogue.

 

In my opinion, writing the majority of the female characters in these generic molds detracts from the development of the individual characters as well as from the development of relatable male-female relationships and felame-female friendships. It's also just plain tiring. Can't strong female characters be something other than bitchy or manipulative? Given that Jordan went through all the trouble of giving women a very large role in the story, this is a disappointing cliche. This isn't to say that there aren't individual exceptions (Min and Birgitte, for instance). But these are the characters I consider somehwat normal...

 

Thanks for letting me vent. And for the record, I am not trying to start some sort of gender argument about this. It's just something I noticed while reading the series, and stands as a stark contrast to the well-developed and unique personalities of the male characters.

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Well, you have to look at the issue in the context of the WoT world. For past 3000 years women have been the only ones able to channel(safely) and use that power to influence politics. Naturally there would become a mentality among women that they are superior and their way is the right way. Most of the women in the story are women of some kind of power be it One Power or political power, so of course they would think this way.

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That makes sense, edman. Your last statement is something I haven't thought of before. Indeed, most of the women in WoT who I consider to be exceptions to the stereotype are "ordinary" women: Min was a miner's daughter, Aviendha was just one of many warriors (before becoming a WO's apprentice), Birgitte is a tomboy despite any power she may have had in a past life, etc.

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Indeed if you examine the women in the story specifically you begin to suspect that it is something RJ has intentionally woven in. In a society where only women can hold the highest position of power, then over the progression of three thousand years there is going to be a naturally matriarchal shift in the balance between the sexes.

 

Indeed, RJ has shown this in that when these women act in a manner that suits such a bias, they arn't as strong or as successful as when they dont. Take for instance the Aiel, where the power between the Wise Ones and the Clan Chiefs has remained relatively balanced, you see a much more equal understanding of gender relations. Aviendha tells Elayne she has to apologise to Mat. There is none of the inherent seperation that exists in Randland main.

 

Its the same with the Seanchan, a much more even gender balance, and a much more realistic understanding between the two. None of one side arrogantly sure of their own rightness, and none of the otherside trying to protect and hide away the women as if they arn't people capable of taking care of themselves.

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Yes, well the 'mirror' of our own gender order (or PAST order) makes for poor reading. So much of RJ's world is brilliant, so i can't complain too much, but TO ME the battle of the sexes has only weakened my experience. Women and men actually understand each other and generally get along without power struggles thank you. This element of 'fantasy' doesn't add to the series at all for me.

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So many great modern literary works have been done with a sublime theme of feminism that it is not surprising at all WoT has these elements also. This world, depicts women as equal, if not more equal than men. Aes Sedai as female, keepers of the ultimate power.

In what kind of age are we talking about here in the WoT world? 16th-18th century Europe?

Just look at our history. Before the suffragette movement, where in the world could we find a woman with so much power? Then through the victorian era we start to have writers subtly commenting on this injustice. look at Heinrich Boll's Lost Honour of Katharina Blum, Jane Eyre, even all the way back to Chaucer's Wife of Bath!

So isn't it just awesome how RJ created a world where this was not a problem at all, never was, never will be?

The taint on Saidin was what kept men so subservient-even kings had to bend to the Amyrlin. The One Power is ultimately a translation of power, military, economic even political.

Now think about this, if there was no taint on Saidin, would the WoT world have been a completely equal world? where both men and women have the same exact amount of power?

We know that men are more powerful in the OP than women;its been stated many times throughout the book. This would obviously have impacts on the balance. I believe personally that if Saidin was never tainted, that male and female aes sedai existed, men would be, in Orwellian language; 'more equal'.

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I dont think it was done as a theme, but as a bid for realism. In such a world with such a situation between the sexes then yes, very likely such gender imbalances would occur. Modern epistomology in both sociology and gender studies supports such a cultural development.

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Indeed, Min and Birgitte are two of the few likeable women in TWoT, including Verin! I dunno, but if RJ intended to glorify women by presenting them this way, he failed. Because I've heard a lot of people respond negatively to the way these female characters are made. And has it ever occured to anyone that many of the hateful characters in this series aren't even the antagonists themselves, but female protagonists? (E.g. , Egwene, Elayne, Faile, Tuon, Cadsuane - you name it: and those are just the protagonists!). I for one anticipate the destruction of the White Tower more than the fall of the Shadow itself. It only goes to show how really hateful the women are portrayed in these series.

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*Nods head vigorously!*

 

I fully understand and agree with the power issue; but women truly are not portrayed in an agreeable light.

 

I love Verin she is one of my favourites!

 

Surprisingly I have come to like Nynaeve, I don't think this truly due to a character change in her but more Egwene's change after becoming an accepted- sure I never like Egwene either but she seems to have become worse!

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I am taking issue with some of this and agreeing with some.

 

Some women, not sure how many, but myself and alot of the women I know, would be considered bitches who nag, manipulate, and control men if men knew everything we did and everything we thought. The reason this seems out of character is because men dont know half the stuff we do behind their backs. I personally think RJ has written the most realistic female characters I have read in a fantasy series. I for one have embraced my manipulative bitchyness.

 

Also, you do have to look at the women we are getting to see here: Aes Sedei, Queens, Warriors, Wise Ones, Wisdoms, Leaders...

 

These are not your average run of the mill women, they dont have the patience or the time to endure stupidity in men or other women.

 

And...EGWENE ROCKS MY FACE OFF!!!!!

 

She is the greatest female character in the series and she ruled in that last book, baby!!!!

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It isn't redressing gender imbalances that have existed in the real world to write a fictional series where the women just make the same kinds of mistakes that men have.

 

Historically, men have been overbearing. In WOT, women are overbearing. etc.

 

Pick any unfavorable male trait that has existed in the real world, and the only difference we have in WOT is that it is the females who most exhibit that trait.

 

To me, what would have been most interesting and enlightening is if the women had shown strong positive traits, rather than just making the same mistakes men have always made.

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To me, what would have been most interesting and enlightening is if the women had shown strong positive traits, rather than just making the same mistakes men have always made.

 

I think that gives women (and humans in general) too much credit. It's human nature to act that way. Making women in power any different from men in power betrays essential human characteristics.

 

However, that being said, I think that there should have been one or two more Moiraine's in this story. By FoH, she had humbled considerably. Definitely my favorite woman in the books.

 

And Egwene has done nothing but improve as she's grown up. She's not nearly as annoying as she used to be, and I loved her machinations in the last book.

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Personally, I think this is one of the reasons RJ says the Light is in a bad way because of the strife between women and men. Also I think it will be good for the AS's humility when they bond Asha'man and then find out that they can't compel them. I would think some Aes Sedai have been humbled and made more cooperative, like those that have, a'hem consumated the bond. Egwene has to be humbled but I don't think she will be because of Eliada's foretelling that she misinterpreted. Rand will probably send help or something to Egwene and she'll get all pissed and unleash her wrath on him. The three amigas, well two cuz Elayne understands, have to come to accept Mat as both a hero and a gambler(Odin).

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Personally' date=' I think this is one of the reasons RJ says the Light is in a bad way because of the strife between women and men. Also I think it will be good for the AS's humility when they bond Asha'man and then find out that they can't compel them. I would think some Aes Sedai have been humbled and made more cooperative, like those that have, a'hem consumated the bond. Egwene has to be humbled but I don't think she will be because of Eliada's foretelling that she misinterpreted. Rand will probably send help or something to Egwene and she'll get all pissed and unleash her wrath on him. The three amigas, well two cuz Elayne understands, have to come to accept Mat as both a hero and a gambler(Odin).[/quote']

 

Just out of interest where do you get the idea from that Aes Sedai will bond Ashaman and not vice versa as well, as both are capable of bonding :P

 

As to what Luckers said before. Not entirely true, take Tear for example, where is there any woman in a position of power there, let alone a channeling woman? They send every girl with the spark with a kick in the bum out of the borders with a reminder never to come back. Also the Tower had to hide that they gave an Aes Sedai advisor to Mayene in order to not upset the Rulers of Tear and give them a reason to annex it. That speaks a lot of Aes Sedai or woman power there doesn't it?

Or how about the White Cloaks, they also manage to keep Aes Sedai from manipulating their politics and remain free from their grasp. So there are some nations which are despite the Taint and this women superiority arguement male dominated, and the two nations are also among the strongest militarily and influentially. How does that fit into the equation?

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As to what Luckers said before. Not entirely true, take Tear for example, where is there any woman in a position of power there, let alone a channeling woman? They send every girl with the spark with a kick in the bum out of the borders with a reminder never to come back. Also the Tower had to hide that they gave an Aes Sedai advisor to Mayene in order to not upset the Rulers of Tear and give them a reason to annex it. That speaks a lot of Aes Sedai or woman power there doesn't it?

Or how about the White Cloaks, they also manage to keep Aes Sedai from manipulating their politics and remain free from their grasp. So there are some nations which are despite the Taint and this women superiority arguement male dominated, and the two nations are also among the strongest militarily and influentially. How does that fit into the equation?

 

Well, firstly. The High Ladies Estanda and Alteima both hold positions of power in tear... or did.

 

But no, its a question of culture. In this culture people know only women can gain that position of power and respect... indeed, thats WHY women with the spark are bundled off so hurriedly.

 

In our own world you can see a similar trend in the influence of religion on gender and culture. All societies that have urbanized have done so under the influence of goddess worship. Stereotypicall over the next thousand years that will shift or convert into god worship, and there is a change in mindset from urbanisation to imperialisation, and expansion. At the same time you get shifts in the way courting works from matchbonds... men winning women, etc, to forced bonds, fathers giving daughters away. The way in which sex is treated also alters at this stage, partriarchies tend to be very don't ask dont tell about sex... not so with matriarchies.

 

It has to do with the way people think, and the way their conceptualisation of the world skews that thinking. A society in Randland could hate Aes sedai, but still be subject to the cultural forces of their existence.

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As to what Luckers said before. Not entirely true' date=' take Tear for example, where is there any woman in a position of power there, let alone a channeling woman? They send every girl with the spark with a kick in the bum out of the borders with a reminder never to come back. Also the Tower had to hide that they gave an Aes Sedai advisor to Mayene in order to not upset the Rulers of Tear and give them a reason to annex it. That speaks a lot of Aes Sedai or woman power there doesn't it?

Or how about the White Cloaks, they also manage to keep Aes Sedai from manipulating their politics and remain free from their grasp. So there are some nations which are despite the Taint and this women superiority arguement male dominated, and the two nations are also among the strongest militarily and influentially. How does that fit into the equation?[/quote']

 

Well, firstly. The High Ladies Estanda and Alteima both hold positions of power in tear... or did.

 

But no, its a question of culture. In this culture people know only women can gain that position of power and respect... indeed, thats WHY women with the spark are bundled off so hurriedly.

 

In our own world you can see a similar trend in the influence of religion on gender and culture. All societies that have urbanized have done so under the influence of goddess worship. Stereotypicall over the next thousand years that will shift or convert into god worship, and there is a change in mindset from urbanisation to imperialisation, and expansion. At the same time you get shifts in the way courting works from matchbonds... men winning women, etc, to forced bonds, fathers giving daughters away. The way in which sex is treated also alters at this stage, partriarchies tend to be very don't ask dont tell about sex... not so with matriarchies.

 

It has to do with the way people think, and the way their conceptualisation of the world skews that thinking. A society in Randland could hate Aes sedai, but still be subject to the cultural forces of their existence.

 

Persian Zoroastrians worshipped a feminine goddess that is new to me. The Chinese worshipping a feminine goddess is also new to me, and according to the Japanese it was "Father" nature not mother nature. The only possible ones I can think of that are in essence goddess worship are the Greeks and early Romans however even their the main God was male. So please tell me where you are coming from and which great civilization had goddess worship? For neither the Asian, Asia Minor, or the Mediterreanean peoples spring to mind as exclusively having followed matriarchal ideals.

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In the Ancient Near East the urbanisation predates Zoroasterianism (or judeo-christianity for that matter). Its around the times of Catal Hyjuk that this was happening, under the influence of goddesses like Cybelle, who incidently was originally from mesopatamia, and was called the Goddess of the Caves. Later she became the Goddess of the Cities, and you can still find shrines to her today in Rome, where she was worshiped for a time, and nearly brought down the state religion with the cult of Isis.

 

The Chinese have many godesses... a pantheon of Goddesses really... or their equivalent. Quan Yin (or Aveloketeshra), the mother of mercy, who stands at the right hand of Yu Huang da di, the Great Jade Emperor in Heaven, and defies him openly when the Monkey King challanges his rule. Now she stands with Guan di Gong, him protecting the empty throne, and her ruling in Yu Huang da di's absense. Maiden Ho, the Holy Immortal, who stole immortality from the seed of the Heroes and proceeded to reign for the next 1000 years.

 

There are hundreds more, but at the time of the urbanisation of China it was Ma Zu, Goddess of the Southern Sea and mother of the Jade Emperor that is the most relevant. This was supposedly before the birth of Yu Huang da di, and before he became a god, much less the Emperor of the Gods. She and her sister, the Queen Mother of the West, as Quan Yin was called in those days ruled in China.

 

note: Quan Yin was a women who brough buddhism to the land, who was later identified as being the Queen Mother of the West, a goddess, by the chinese in much the same way Jesus was in christianity--Chinese folk religions are... i beleve the term is, euhuministic... humans become gods, great leaders are later assumed to be old gods, etc.

 

As for the Japanese, again, there are many gods in Shinto--the Kami, as they are called. At the time of urbanisation, two ruled... Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto, who were brother and sister, and husband and wife. They touched the earth with a spear from heaven, creating japan, and gave birth to the later gods and goddesses. She was killed giving birth to the God of Fire, and he consumed by death (Yomi) in a bid to save her.

 

However, your comment about father nature is not entirely accurate. The son of amatarsu omikami was interlocked with the physical existence of the island of japan, though he was not 'father nature'. The natural elements each had their own deity. Amatarasu Omikami ruled them, and still does. She was the Goddess of the Sun.

 

The fact is almost all hunter-gatherer societies have a goddess worship base at the time of urbanisation that changes over the thousand years following, as that change occurs, so too does the way the genders interact.

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I think that the point made earlier in this discussion about 3000 years of female Aes Sedai rule was right on and, frankly, something I had not considered. But while this helps put the female characters into context, I still take exception to the fact that most of them are portrayed as bitches.

 

Yes, if there was a constant narrative of women's every pissy thought, we would all sound like these characters at some point, but not all the time. That's what gets tiring - the constant stubborness, the evil looks, the damn "sniffing" and braid-tugging from the protagonists. On the one hand, I agree that they are not a random sample but represent strong, powerful women. (We all also know from experience that you get trouble with too many alphas in one room, regardless of gender.) On the other hand, it looks like a cop-out, like Jordan made one generic and unflattering female mold and just tweaked it a bit here and there. (Yes, yes, there are always exceptions, like Moraine and Egwene). Although power can certainly go to a someone's, I disagree with the assumption that in WOT, only bitches are powerful (or are all the powerful women bitches by definition?). That's like saying all the powerful male characters are pricks, which I don't think is the case at all.

 

What ultimately frustrates me is that I can't decide if this is a well-intended attempt to present powerful and empowered female characters or a deliberately negative portrayal.

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In the Ancient Near East the urbanisation predates Zoroasterianism (or judeo-christianity for that matter). Its around the times of Catal Hyjuk that this was happening' date=' under the influence of goddesses like Cybelle, who incidently was originally from mesopatamia, and was called the Goddess of the Caves. Later she became the Goddess of the Cities, and you can still find shrines to her today in Rome, where she was worshiped for a time, and nearly brought down the state religion with the cult of Isis.

 

The Chinese have many godesses... a pantheon of Goddesses really... or their equivalent. Quan Yin (or Aveloketeshra), the mother of mercy, who stands at the right hand of Yu Huang da di, the Great Jade Emperor in Heaven, and defies him openly when the Monkey King challanges his rule. Now she stands with Guan di Gong, him protecting the empty throne, and her ruling in Yu Huang da di's absense. Maiden Ho, the Holy Immortal, who stole immortality from the seed of the Heroes and proceeded to reign for the next 1000 years.

 

There are hundreds more, but at the time of the urbanisation of China it was Ma Zu, Goddess of the Southern Sea and mother of the Jade Emperor that is the most relevant. This was supposedly before the birth of Yu Huang da di, and before he became a god, much less the Emperor of the Gods. She and her sister, the Queen Mother of the West, as Quan Yin was called in those days ruled in China.

 

note: Quan Yin was a women who brough buddhism to the land, who was later identified as being the Queen Mother of the West, a goddess, by the chinese in much the same way Jesus was in christianity--Chinese folk religions are... i beleve the term is, euhuministic... humans become gods, great leaders are later assumed to be old gods, etc.

 

As for the Japanese, again, there are many gods in Shinto--the Kami, as they are called. At the time of urbanisation, two ruled... Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto, who were brother and sister, and husband and wife. They touched the earth with a spear from heaven, creating japan, and gave birth to the later gods and goddesses. She was killed giving birth to the God of Fire, and he consumed by death (Yomi) in a bid to save her.

 

However, your comment about father nature is not entirely accurate. The son of amatarsu omikami was interlocked with the physical existence of the island of japan, though he was not 'father nature'. The natural elements each had their own deity. Amatarasu Omikami ruled them, and still does. She was the Goddess of the Sun.

 

The fact is almost all hunter-gatherer societies have a goddess worship base at the time of urbanisation that changes over the thousand years following, as that change occurs, so too does the way the genders interact.[/quote']

 

And that almost nowhere in the world extensive goddess worship exists really shows its worth no? If it really existed in all those places, and got shunted and replaced it shows a certain inferiority and impracticality doesn't it? Otherwise it would still be present and worshipped such as the Abrahamic religions, Hinduism, Taoism, Buddhism, Animist beliefs and Druze. However nowhere in the world does it show up to any degree, so to be true my ignorance or lack of knowledge of the before is quite understandable as the religion of 5000+ which has no successor today (exception Shintoism but then again it is not a goddess worshipping religion either, at least not fully). So we can just say evolution weeded out the inferior or less able religions?

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Lol. Let me preface my response by saying that my original point was not anything to do with their value as religions, but that the cultural phenemona described in WoT by the existence of the Aes Sedai is not unprecedented. The influence of the way gender is percieved, and the power imbued in gender, occured and can be paralleled in many religions.

 

That being said, your wrong in pretty much everything you said. Heres why...

 

And that almost nowhere in the world extensive goddess worship exists really shows its worth no? If it really existed in all those places, and got shunted and replaced it shows a certain inferiority and impracticality doesn't it? Otherwise it would still be present and worshipped

 

Well aside from the fact that they are still present--indeed, currently the number of people that worship a goddess outnumbers those that worship only a god--which ill touch upon in a second, your premise, that it shows a weakness is both wrong and right.

 

Historically speaking goddess worship is aligned with urbanisation of hunter-gatherer societies. Without their influence civilisation would not exist. When god worship appears, the goals of a society become expansion, imperialism and colonialism... christianity in particular lent itself to this.

 

What you find, therefore, is that male religions grant the people in power more power. This is why they almost universally usurped the places originally held by goddess worship. At least for a time. Christianity is one of the few religions that completely struck off any form of goddess worship, in the others it was merely a matter of which of the gods held power. For instance during the urbanisation of China Ma Zu held power, but then when the imperialism started you see the appearence of Yu Huang da di. Then, when the wars end and the Empire settles again you see Yu Huang da di leave his thrown, and rule of heaven taken over by Quan yin, Queen Mother of the West.

 

As for it showing a weakness... that isn't true, because male based religions have been over-turned by female, such as with Quan Yin, or Amataresu Omikami... Indeed, the story of how Maiden Ho came to have power was that she stole it from a man when he ejaculated in her.

 

Its not a weakness or a strength, its an echo of perceptions, and what is needed.

 

Otherwise it would still be present and worshipped such as the Abrahamic religions, Hinduism, Taoism, Buddhism, Animist beliefs and Druze. However nowhere in the world does it show up to any degree, so to be true my ignorance or lack of knowledge of the before is quite understandable as the religion of 5000+ which has no successor today (exception Shintoism but then again it is not a goddess worshipping religion either, at least not fully). So we can just say evolution weeded out the inferior or less able religions?

 

Except it is still present today... you listed the sources. Toaism is the source of Maiden Ho worship, as well as many other imortals (its a Taoist concept), Chinese Folk religion of Quan Yin, the Queen Mother of the West, and Ma Zu, though she has become less significant, as well as a legion of other lesser gods and goddesses. Buddhism doesn't involve any form of god worship, but recognizes Quan Yin as a boddhisatva of great power. Shinto primrary is Amaterasu Omikami, the Sun Goddess. The Druids and the Wiccans both worship a pantheistic feminine goddess. Hinduism, which i didn't touch upon--mainly because i dont actually know how brahmic culture formed--contains a veritable pantheon of goddesses.

 

Animistic cults worship neither gods nor goddesses, but spirits, include feminine ones.

 

So your ignorence is still evident it would seem, because about the only one of the ones ive listed that has died out completely is worship of Cybelle, and i recently found out that their is still a practicing cult of Cybelle in Canada--which i find disconcerting, given Cybelles opinions about sacrifices, but meh.

 

Your ignorence comes not from the lack of these religions... currently those that worship a goddess of some form outnumber those that worship only a god. It comes from an arrogant preconception that permeates the western world about religions... specifically, that partriarchal religious formats are the only ones left.

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Lol. Let me preface my response by saying that my original point was not anything to do with their value as religions' date=' but that the cultural phenemona described in WoT by the existence of the Aes Sedai is not unprecedented. The influence of the way gender is percieved, and the power imbued in gender, occured and can be paralleled in many religions.

 

That being said, your wrong in pretty much everything you said. Heres why...

 

And that almost nowhere in the world extensive goddess worship exists really shows its worth no? If it really existed in all those places, and got shunted and replaced it shows a certain inferiority and impracticality doesn't it? Otherwise it would still be present and worshipped

 

Well aside from the fact that they are still present--indeed, currently the number of people that worship a goddess outnumbers those that worship only a god--which ill touch upon in a second, your premise, that it shows a weakness is both wrong and right.

 

Historically speaking goddess worship is aligned with urbanisation of hunter-gatherer societies. Without their influence civilisation would not exist. When god worship appears, the goals of a society become expansion, imperialism and colonialism... christianity in particular lent itself to this.

 

What you find, therefore, is that male religions grant the people in power more power. This is why they almost universally usurped the places originally held by goddess worship. At least for a time. Christianity is one of the few religions that completely struck off any form of goddess worship, in the others it was merely a matter of which of the gods held power. For instance during the urbanisation of China Ma Zu held power, but then when the imperialism started you see the appearence of Yu Huang da di. Then, when the wars end and the Empire settles again you see Yu Huang da di leave his thrown, and rule of heaven taken over by Quan yin, Queen Mother of the West.

 

As for it showing a weakness... that isn't true, because male based religions have been over-turned by female, such as with Quan Yin, or Amataresu Omikami... Indeed, the story of how Maiden Ho came to have power was that she stole it from a man when he ejaculated in her.

 

Its not a weakness or a strength, its an echo of perceptions, and what is needed.

 

Otherwise it would still be present and worshipped such as the Abrahamic religions, Hinduism, Taoism, Buddhism, Animist beliefs and Druze. However nowhere in the world does it show up to any degree, so to be true my ignorance or lack of knowledge of the before is quite understandable as the religion of 5000+ which has no successor today (exception Shintoism but then again it is not a goddess worshipping religion either, at least not fully). So we can just say evolution weeded out the inferior or less able religions?

 

Except it is still present today... you listed the sources. Toaism is the source of Maiden Ho worship, as well as many other imortals (its a Taoist concept), Chinese Folk religion of Quan Yin, the Queen Mother of the West, and Ma Zu, though she has become less significant, as well as a legion of other lesser gods and goddesses. Buddhism doesn't involve any form of god worship, but recognizes Quan Yin as a boddhisatva of great power. Shinto primrary is Amaterasu Omikami, the Sun Goddess. The Druids and the Wiccans both worship a pantheistic feminine goddess. Hinduism, which i didn't touch upon--mainly because i dont actually know how brahmic culture formed--contains a veritable pantheon of goddesses.

 

Animistic cults worship neither gods nor goddesses, but spirits, include feminine ones.

 

So your ignorence is still evident it would seem, because about the only one of the ones ive listed that has died out completely is worship of Cybelle, and i recently found out that their is still a practicing cult of Cybelle in Canada--which i find disconcerting, given Cybelles opinions about sacrifices, but meh.

 

Your ignorence comes not from the lack of these religions... currently those that worship a goddess of some form outnumber those that worship only a god. It comes from an arrogant preconception that permeates the western world about religions... specifically, that partriarchal religious formats are the only ones left.

 

Christians; 2 Billion people.

Muslims; 1.3 Billion people.

Sikhism; 23 million

Judaism; 14 million

Druze; 1 million

Hinduism; 1 billion (they believe in Brahman a sexless God that is pure knowledge and infinite, the (impersonal God), who appears as many avatars. Brahman may appear male or female, so in no way is Hinduism in the slightest Goddess worship, more a sexless entity worship that represents infinitum and knowledge).

 

World Population; 6.5 Billion

 

 

Now I don't know who taught you maths, but even keeping "tradition chinese religion", "animism", "Taoism" and "Buddhism" in the Goddess worship section, they are still in the clear minority. Time to ring up your math teacher I presume.

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