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A WHEEL OF TIME COMMUNITY

Far from the Madding Crowd


Glexn
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After many years, I finally made the connection between the title of this classic and one other particular thing. I was wondering if it's title is a coincidence, or if Thomas Hardy retroactively stole RJ's words. Anyone know if there's any relation at all? Did RJ just like it, or is there a connection between the book and the city? It's been sitting on my stand for a long time, but I can't bear to start reading, so I don't know.

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After many years, I finally made the connection between the title of this classic and one other particular thing. I was wondering if it's title is a coincidence, or if Thomas Hardy retroactively stole RJ's words. Anyone know if there's any relation at all? Did RJ just like it, or is there a connection between the book and the city? It's been sitting on my stand for a long time, but I can't bear to start reading, so I don't know.

 

I can't tell if this is sarcasm. Far from the Madding Crowd was released in 1874.

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After many years, I finally made the connection between the title of this classic and one other particular thing. I was wondering if it's title is a coincidence, or if Thomas Hardy retroactively stole RJ's words. Anyone know if there's any relation at all? Did RJ just like it, or is there a connection between the book and the city? It's been sitting on my stand for a long time, but I can't bear to start reading, so I don't know.

 

I can't tell if this is sarcasm. Far from the Madding Crowd was released in 1874.

 

Well, remember that time is a wheel and everything circles back around. Thomas Hardy stole the name from when RJ wrote the books in the last turning of the wheel thousands and thousands of years ago!

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RJ was asked this in a question in CNN chat , 2000

 

Question from Rodynus: Was the name of Far Madding a literary allusion to An Elegy in a Country Churchyard?

 

RJ: No. That straight-out answer shocked you, didn't it?

 

Now maybe he as trying to be tricky and it was named after the book "Far from the madding crowd" that was taken from the elegy, but it seems a bit over the top.

 

As a bit of trivia, "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard" was written in 1751 and the 18th stanza is

Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife,

Their sober wishes never learned to stray;

Along the cool sequestered vale of life

They kept the noiseless tenor of their way.

 

Far From the Madding Crowd was written in 1874 and the title was taken from the previous quote.

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After many years, I finally made the connection between the title of this classic and one other particular thing. I was wondering if it's title is a coincidence, or if Thomas Hardy retroactively stole RJ's words. Anyone know if there's any relation at all? Did RJ just like it, or is there a connection between the book and the city? It's been sitting on my stand for a long time, but I can't bear to start reading, so I don't know.

 

I can't tell if this is sarcasm. Far from the Madding Crowd was released in 1874.

 

=]

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