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A WHEEL OF TIME COMMUNITY

Mr Ares

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About Mr Ares

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    The Baby-Eating Bishop of Bath and Wells

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  1. So why would I bother going back and re-reading? It is specifically stated by people who don't know. Mashadar was in Shadar Logoth, it was destroyed. Fain survived, with a portion of SL's power. That took over and killed Fain. The result was something which resembles Mashadar, and so might well be called such. But just because a son resembles a father doesn't mean they are the same thing.
  2. Shaisam was something Fain grew into. It is neither Mashadar nor Machin Shin (although it grew from the same root as Mashadar). As for the taint, as was stated in the books, the Ways were made with tainted saidin. Therefore the taint was always there, it simply took time to corrupt the Ways enough for Machin Shin to arise.
  3. Compelled, not Compulsed. As for what would happen, nothing. Or at least the Compusion would be unaffected - if you mind rape people to the extent Graendal did then I doubt her no longer being around would be good for you. But for Compulsion itself, it's a weave. Tied off weaves have no further connection to the weaver, and thus their death would have no effect. If I shot you, the bullet does damage. If the bullet is removed, the damage is still there. It's really not unreasonable to believe that Turning someone creates a change but that change is not something requiring the ongoing infl
  4. Why would it? Unless Shai'tan's influence is active and ongoing then it's not at all unreasonable that people who were turned would continue to be turned. We see an example of this in RJ's comments on the Ways - the Taint caused the corruption, but just because the Taint is gone doesn't mean the corruption will go away, because the Taint was just a cause, not an ongoing component of the corruption of the Ways.
  5. There's no indication in the text that Slayer or T'a'r were involved, and every indication that it was Graendal acting alone - she killed him as a crime of opportunity, she didn't go out of her way to do it.
  6. The thing that amuses me about the BS conversation is the tendency to make excuse after excuse for Brandon. Yes, he was dealing with a very difficult task. That doesn't mean we should refrain from pointing out the flaws of his work, any more than we refrain from pointing out the flaws of RJ's. The problems with thousands of channelers disappearing for the Last Battle and the timeline going all Steven Erikson on us (OK, Brandon didn't screw it up that badly) exist - saying "only hardcore fans will pick up on them" is not a defence. It's a problem, and it's one Team Jordan should have picked up
  7. The thing that amuses me about the BS conversation is the tendency to make excuse after excuse for Brandon. Yes, he was dealing with a very difficult task. That doesn't mean we should refrain from pointing out the flaws of his work, any more than we refrain from pointing out the flaws of RJ's. The problems with thousands of channelers disappearing for the Last Battle and the timeline going all Steven Erikson on us (OK, Brandon didn't screw it up that badly) exist - saying "only hardcore fans will pick up on them" is not a defence. It's a problem, and it's one Team Jordan should have picked up
  8. None of those points explain or excuse the problems with Brandon's prose. He's simply not as good a prose writer as RJ was. No amount of "only hardcore fans will notice the numbers don't add up" really addresses that. RJ was quite capable of going overboard with description and being long-winded. Brandon managed to do the same thing, but without RJ's flair, without RJ's skill with foreshadowing. Thus Brandon was, if anything, even more prone to padding than RJ was.
  9. None of those points explain or excuse the problems with Brandon's prose. He's simply not as good a prose writer as RJ was. No amount of "only hardcore fans will notice the numbers don't add up" really addresses that. RJ was quite capable of going overboard with description and being long-winded. Brandon managed to do the same thing, but without RJ's flair, without RJ's skill with foreshadowing. Thus Brandon was, if anything, even more prone to padding than RJ was.
  10. No, it really, really didn't. RJ's writing was not without its flaws, but Brandon avoided none of those flaws, and added his own. Demandred wouldn't necessarily play fair. And Mat had a more important job. Why should Rand have used the TP more? Given it's addictive, and dangerous, surely using it as little as possible just makes sense? The Brown librarian you've never really heard of was the leading candidate - it's like Who Killed Asmo, we were mostly just at the stage of waiting for a confirmation as we'd worked it out already. The Two Rivers is four villages and a
  11. RJ's record is more mixed than you're trying to make out. Even in the later books, known as they are for their sprawl, he shows an ability to handle a plotline with economy. And KoD tied off plots and brought things closer to a conclusion. The mid-books are the ones which sprawl most. Look at the early books as individual works - EotW starts out with one group, they split int multiple groups, things are drawn together for a conclusion. The middle bits have the most sprawl, they are when things are most spread out. The endings draw things together and increase the pace. This is not something un
  12. I'm hoping either Mr Ares or Suttree will come and tell you how wrong you are. RJ was on a clear route to the finish-line with KoD and the plot was moving towards the Last Day / Battle just fine. *shrugs* Suttree explained it best in many of his late 2012 / early 2013 posts IIRC. Ask and you shall receive: It's worth noting that RJ issued a lot of qualified statements - "at least three more books", things like that - but then when KoD came out it was billed as the penultimate book, with no qualifiers. He obviously was sufficiently confident in that that he convinced his publishers to put i
  13. Most likely that was something Brandon was unaware of when he wrote the books. Either that or RJ misspoke or changed his mind before it came to that. In Asmo's case even if he had the means to escape he had nowhere to escape to, as Lanfear spread the word he had gone traitor. Asmo's best bet was to wait it out and look for opportunities - an actual betrayal of Shai'tan to side with Rand, or a betrayal of Rand to get him back in his master's good graces. Escaping and running off wouldn't help. The TP was not handed out willy-nilly, and it was sufficiently dangerous to use that no-one bar
  14. Why did it not make sense to kill off Fain earlier? He was in a sword fight with Rand in WH. Face to face with his nemesis, in a fight that could easily have been to the death. He survives, flees, and doesn't appear again until ToM, four books later, and then only a single scene in the prologue. What was the point in saving his life? People can point out that RJ didn't always give his villains epic deaths, and I don't disagree - but why did he escape a suitably unepic death to do absolutely nothing more than fill up a few more pages? Compare with Sammael - he doesn't escape Shadar Logoth only
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