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DRAGONMOUNT

A WHEEL OF TIME COMMUNITY

Bushwhacker2k

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About Bushwhacker2k

  • Birthday 10/31/1990
  1. Nynaeve and Elayne are powerful channelers and Min has the Doomsight (or whatever Tuon called it), which generally covers the gambit of their exploits, other than Elayne being trained from birth.
  2. That was my point when I mentioned Galad. His familial relationship to Rand ultimately meant nothing, but it was actually a surprisingly close relationship that WAS explicitly mentioned- whereas Isam/Luc's relationships to two of the most significant characters aren't ever explicitly stated (unless I'm simply forgetting it). How do you know there's an afterlife? - I'm going to have to specifically look for this when I eventually reread the first book but I could swear that Egwene was referring to Moiraine's angreal when she mentioned items having power and Moiraine mentioned that "items don't have power" or something along those lines. Pardon my mistake- where is it stated what the Ring is? I assume the Rods of Dominion still refer to objects, as the Amyrlin Seat is actually a physical object in addition to being the name of a position. Very debateable. I think you're right. I just really felt that it was too aggressive, as the societies in this seem to maintain a (as far as I could tell) realististic structure... but everyone just acts like women are better despite the fact that it doesn't play into the nature of the society... I'm sure everyone has their opinion on this, but I strongly feel it's the biggest flaw of the series in how it doesn't contribute anything to the story and it just adds this unpleasant air to everything. :D - What's the BWB? I think you're mixing Balthamel up with Aran'gar here. ... Wait. Are Aginor/Balthamel Osan'gar and Aran'gar!? HOLY CRAP I NEVER REALIZED THAT! So THAT'S why it was mentioned that one of them created Trollocs! Because one of them was Aginor! Holy crap I've read this so much and I never realized... Wait, now I'm questioning it. When Moridin and Cyndane showed up everyone was like "Who are they!? They must be Ishmael and Lanfear!" but when Osan'gar and Aran'gar show up they NEVER mention their original names in reference to them. This is really weird... - Ehhh, that's way overly particular, especially since I don't think Moiraine knew what wells were (correct me if I'm wrong, but cite your sources). It's a little ridiculous when you consider that some angreal are more 'powerful' than others. It's been a week or two since I finished the book so memory isn't as fresh- I don't think they did that, but as far as I can remember that sounds plausible. Like I mentioned in a different comment, his relationship with Galad was brought up, despite the fact that he never had any real connection to Galad- so I maintain that it's weird that the relationship was never explicitly stated. I think with almost everything else I kind of bought that they picked it up because it was some 'ability' that was only demonstrated with saying "and they used the ability, and it was great" like Rand's swordsmanship and abilities with the power, which are frequently demonstrated as spontaneous things done instinctively/with intuition (which I guess made sense, since Aes Sedai never try new things because they fear getting burned out). With Perrin I strongly felt that his leadership came from being Ta'veren, because it was explained that if Tam or other people tried similar things it wouldn't have had the same effect. Egwene's state was not some kind of spontaneous ability, and I always felt like where the abilities spoke for themselves her position was demonstrated with how everyone else wouldn't shut up about how amazing she is- when I was almost never particularly impressed with what she did. If they had just said that she was Ta'veren as well I wouldn't have questioned it but whereas Rand, Mat and Perrin's abilities could almost exclusively be chalked up to Ta'veren/special abilities- we're supposed to buy that Egwene is just perfect and amazing. I never had a problem with Egwene's dreamwalker/dreamer status, just how everyone reacted to her.
  3. They were created by Channelers who had Foretellings. They were believed for that reason - Foretellings always come to pass. Is it explicitly stated in the books? I don't recall ever seeing it, but it is the most plausible reason. That's it exactly - to be fully Healed, you need to be Healed cross-gender. It's just one of many examples of men and women being better working together. As for why they didn't get it Healed later, they had already been Healed - there's no longer a problem to fix.It's unknown if they could be Healed back to their original strength if they were severed again, but I doubt it's something they wish to experiment with given that severing is described as exceedingly painful. I'm pretty sure it's never actually addressed, I don't think Siuan and Leane ever even heard or mentioned Flinn's healing. I bet if he tried to heal them again he could just finish what Nynaeve started. Rand wanted to be left alone. He has done his duty, he has put down the mountain. If people think he is dead, then they are unlikely to come after him, expecting his help or wanting him to take up further duties. I wasn't asking the ultimate motivation, I got that, I wanted to know how they suddenly knew and decided upon it. The most plausible explanation would be that Rand communicated via the bond to tell them his entire plan, but that doesn't make sense as he was unconscious while the plan would have been formulated. Ultimately I think this one has no good explanation. Isam is Lan's cousin, but it's not really addressed because it's not really important - Luc is aware of his relationship to Rand and references it, but it doesn't really matter to him, and it wouldn't really matter to Rand. The family that matters to Rand is Tam, Elayne, Aviendha and Min. Thanks, I read the books, I know he didn't personally know Luc, but his relationship to Galad, however 'unimportant' was brought up very explicitly in the last book. Fain's destabilising influence was the crucial difference. Iiiinteresting! I never realized this... so Fain manipulated the White Tower somehow? When was this stated? My interpretation is that as the world is being created by Rand, it is influenced by him. He's trying to show a world without evil, but on some level can't accept that such a thing is possible, so the world he ends up with is twisted and wrong. But the existence of death doesn't imply the existence of Shai'tan, not even the eating of living things. That's a good answer, that makes a lot of sense to me... But I'm pretty sure death does imply Shai'tan, as they said in the last book, he is the space between blinks, he is the time between lives. I think, simply put, his view was that men and women were different but equal. A world in which women dominate is going to result in many of the exact same problems as a world in which men dominate (although the inherent biases and the way in which that domination manifests won't always be the same). Was it just supposed to be some kind of juxtaposition, showing that women being considered inherently better is no better than the alternative? Honestly it came off so strongly I got the impression he actually did believe women are just inherently better. There really needed to be a little more balance throughout the series about this, it got really pointlessly obnoxious at times.
  4. I just finished the series yesterday, after having started reading it back around 2005 or so. Now I want to discuss it a little bit, ask some questions about things that seem unresolved or that I didn't understand. Who wrote the multitude of prophecies (Karaethon Cycle, Jendai Prophecy, etc.) and why are they so universally believed? Who was Balthamel? He is seriously the least explored of the Forsaken, I know just about nothing about him. Why did Sammael die so anticlimactically? I was certain he'd show up later because his death was so impersonal and so unexplored, but then he didn't... Why did Siuan and Leane never get their abilities fully restored, even though it's strongly implied that Flinn's healing could fully restore stilling (since when he healed stilled Aes Sedai they never mentioned being weaker, like Siuan and Leane did from Nynaeve's healing - though Logain never seemed to complain about not being at full strength either, thus implying a man can heal a woman's stilling and a woman can heal a man's gentling) Why was Sevanna treated as a Wise Woman, despite the fact that you have to go to Rhuidean to be considered one? (this was partially addressed but I didn't really buy it because it didn't make sense) Who was Nakomi, the woman Aviendha met in the waste? What caused Gawyn to so strongly believe Rand killed his mother? (I think the book kind of settled on it being jealousy, but that didn't make much sense to me) What ever happened to angreals not "having power" that Moiraine got so anal about in the first book? (Guessing it's that trope where the author changes his mind about things in the continuum after publishing the first major work) What was the Rod of Tamyrlin? Why did Rand's wives (I dunno if they were formally married but whatever) all spontaneously and simultaneously agree to cover up that Rand was still alive? Did they agree to it beforehand? It doesn't actually make much sense (even though I get that it's the riding into the sunset ending trope). Why was it never addressed that Luc is Rand's uncle (unless I made a mistake somewhere while reading) and Isam is Lan's uncle? Getting more into my personal feelings here- I want to stress that the next questions are based on my interpretations and not something anyone who disagrees ought to worry about. Why did Elaida turn into a moustache-twirling villain after becoming Amyrlin? I couldn't take the change seriously at all. I totally don't buy the whole 'drunk with power' schtick, she got way over the top in a way I couldn't take seriously. Why did Egwene get turned into such a Mary Sue? In the first half of the books she was pretty likeable but once she was close to becoming Aes Sedai it's like everyone and everything had to marvel in how perfect she was, despite how young she was, and how she could do no wrong and everyone else should bow before her greatness. I guess this doesn't really qualify as a question, but I felt similarly about Elayne (to a much lesser extent). Arymilla was turned into her Elaida, where her enemy was made into someone who everyone so universally disliked and considered an absolute fool that it kind of felt insulting that she was supposed to the antithesis to that, where she was just so obviously the best choice in every situation and everyone should bow before her and she inherently deserves the world's love and adoration more than anyone else... moving on. Once again more a statement than a question- I didn't buy that the nearly perfect reality Rand eventually made was something untouched by the Dark One. (I feel like that's just something story-tellers do to justify their perception of the world) Rand's entire hope of that reality crumbled when he perceived Elayne as stupid, which is really silly when you break it down- like people can't be intelligent without absolute evil existing in the world? Not to mention he saw his body, thus implying death still exists, and he saw a spider (which, unless I'm quite mistaken, only eat other bugs, thus meaning living things are still killed and consumed) thusly implying the world was still very much touched by the Dark One. This is probably the most significant question about the nature of the series and what I strongly view to be the single greatest flaw of the Wheel of Time series: What was Robert Jordan's view on Feminism? The way females act in WoT is so stark that it inherently colors every single element of the series. I've read most of the books several times and I've seen what seems to be both sides of the coin, where people act like females are inherently correct because they're females and where they look foolish for acting the way most of them seem to. I simply can't figure it out. What is his perspective? Why did he write them this way? What was he trying to say? For the time being these are my questions on the series. I'll very likely come up with more but I just had to discuss one of my favorite series of all time.
  5. A good point. I don't know much about the original Children or Aes Sedai though. Yeah, it's kind of funny they don't address the evil in those groups as much as evil creatures and "The Dark One." I know they do address it, but so many people in both groups are so wrong as far as good in humanity goes.
  6. After a quick glimpse at my library, I would be bold enough to claim that they still are books. Fool! They are using the cloak of mirrors! It is an illusion! >:O --- I think the reason they nation has the same name as a capital is that the capital city is in control of the land and thus is called as such. Kings and Queens aren't exactly rare, especially in fantasy novels. He didn't want to only have kings and queens, so he used High lords. Daes Dae'mar is effectively a term for extreme politics. The female ruler bit is definitely true. I've noticed Jordan gives a lot of power to women in the series, more than men oftentime. Aes Sedai and Asha'man are groups COMPLETELY made of channelers, it would be really weird if their leaders weren't channelers. I don't recall Shara being ruled by a channeler, but I don't remember much about it in general so meh. Min doesn't really 'know' the future, she just sees things. Foretellers can tell the future... yep, no arguement there. I guess I haven't read in a while, what is a dreamer? I guess I don't remember that part, Dreamwalkers can see the future? I feel that most of what you pointed out doesn't really mean much, not meaning to offend, just saying. --- Oh, I agree with Jethro, the names are very regional. --- Wait, Seanchan can have a male ruler? That's pretty surprising, I totally figured it was another group in which women ruled everything and men did everything they told them to without question. There seem to be a lot of those. --- Ooo, this talk of connections and the Ogier's 'longing' and how I watched an episode of House earlier today makes me think maybe it's like a drug addiction! --- Jeez, didn't notice that before... there ARE a lot of O's in creatures' names! :O --- I see now why the sticky said not to joke too often... like 1 person took this seriously. Not that I don't like the jokes, just saying. Also, this is about similarities. If ALL of something is the same, they it becomes something to take for granted, like ALL Aes Sedai can channel, GASP!!!!!!! Has anyone else noticed how cocky some people are in this series? There is a MASSIVE amount of people who love controlling people and will NEVER accept they are wrong, I'm not even talking about the bad guys.
  7. Aes Sedai means 'servants of all' right? Does anyone else find this extremely laughable? I think 'those who make all other serve them' is slightly closer.
  8. Makes sense, but unless I'm mistaken gateways are something not every Aes Sedai can do, it would be exhausting. If air weaves are tied, they become practically solid. The soldiers wouldn't be able to move. Sorry to argue against~ Of course, there is the obvious: fireballs and lightning. But Aes Sedai have taken an oath not to kill, so it wouldn't be good against most enemies. I wonder how tightly most use the oath in that way? Like would using the power to kill someone indirectly count? Splitting apart the earth to swallow up enemy forces and making them unable to proceed would be pretty effective, but again that wouldn't be something easy to do. You would have to have a general idea of where the enemy was already before using a gateway to spy on them, but other than that, it seems like a decent idea. Most of my ideas are using the environment against them: If they are in a forest, burn it. If they are near mountains, cause an avalanch or rock slide. Interesting topic :)
  9. Hey, everyone. I've been a fan of the Wheel of Time series for at least a few years now. I had read through the entire series(up to where it's been published, at least) 5 times now, and I'm starting my 6th read through.
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