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DRAGONMOUNT

A WHEEL OF TIME COMMUNITY

NewJeffCT

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  1. My guess is that possibly Jordan started listening to the audiobooks and informed them the original pronunciation was incorrect? Just a stab in the dark, though.
  2. I think it's probably too much work to have that much back & forth between the male & female characters, so leaving each narrator to read their male or female POV and also do the opposite sex voices probably works a lot easier and requires less editing. Other than the huge cast of World War, it was really the first audiobook I'd listened to that had both a male and female narrator. Roy Dotrice is acclaimed for his work on A Song of Ice & Fire, but he does all the characters, male and female.
  3. No, not really, to be honest. Leaving politics out of it, Ted Cruz and the Tea Party people that led the shutdown were mostly fairly new to Congress. Elaida and the Red Ajah were hardly neophytes, and there was nobody as tough, smart, wise and competent as Egwene on either side of the aisle in Washington DC.
  4. Well, it took me maybe 9 months,as I also listened not just on driving to work: weekends, business trips, errands at lunchtime, etc.
  5. I have a long drive to work each day (45-50 minutes each way... though, that's probably not long for some who live in big cities like NY, Houston or LA.) So, I've found listening to audiobooks a good way to pass the time on the road. The local libraries here in Connecticut are inter-connected, so if my town library doesn't have a copy of the Lord of Chaos audiobook, they can have one delivered from another town library that does. But, when I found out the series was finally finished early this year and I was looking for something new to "listen" to on my commute, I went back to the Wheel of Time. I found the two narrators to be excellent - Michael Kramer and Kate Reading. I've listened to several audiobooks before and this was the first one, other than the huge cast of the World War Z audiobook, that had a woman doing to female points of view. It was refreshing to hear a woman's voice doing Egwene, Nynaeve, Elayne, Aviendha, etc's points of view. I think it added to the story. I thought Kramer was consistently very good as well, and his voice became Rand, Perrin and Mat in my head. The previous series that I listened to that had multiple points of view - A Song of Ice & Fire - only had one narrator, the otherwise excellent Roy Dotrice. (though, I winced a few times when the gravel voiced, and now 90 year old, Dotrice was "reading' the sex scenes.) I'd also rate Jim Dale's reading of the Harry Potter books as excellent as well, as was Simon Vance, the reader of the three Stieg Larsson books (Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and its sequels.) I just wanted to hear what other people thought of Wheel of Time audiobooks?
  6. I would add that this is pure opinion which is not shared by most in the WoT community and not really backed-up beyond a desire to criticize the last three books. Considering the level of plot progression from ACoS through coT, there was plenty of plot left to sustain four books. In fact, saying that there was not enough is really an odd position to take given the history of the series. I would suggests doing a re-read of the series so that you can see what I mean. I am not saying that four books would have been a good idea, but it was certainly possible. Thanks - I realize there are places to go beyond where the story ended - Rand and his future and what happens with Avi, Min and Elayne, Mat and Tuon, Perrin and Faile, the rise of the Two Rivers, the Seanchan, rebuilding Andor and the Borderlands, the future of the Aiel, etc (there's probably fan fiction on these things already...) But, I think you understood my point of things happening before and during the last battle could have been more extensive as well, IMHO.
  7. No. Structurally, there wasn't enough to even sustain three books. Whatever other problems there may have been, running out of pages was never one of them. I might disagree with that - I think they could have given us a bit more on Padan Fain in the previous two books - even if just a section of a chapter in each book. Seems kind of odd to pull him out at the very end after he wasn't in the previous few books. I thought they could have done a bit more with the Tinkers as well, instead of having them just show up and help behind the scenes, and maybe a few of them question their beliefs. Whatever happened to the song they were looking for? What about Valan Luca and his show? Was Elaida mentioned at all after that one encounter with Tuon in Ebou Dar after she had become damane? (was up late last night trying to finish the book, and just finished it now.) Maybe a few more POVs from the battlefields? All of those points add to the length of a book, but they don't provide the basis for increasing the number of books. In terms of a books structure, telling a story with a beginning, middle and end, a few scenes with Fain adds nothing, same with the Tinkers. Remember that none of Brandon's books is in the top three for length (going by the figures Wikipedia has posted, and acknowledging that there isn't a lot between FoH's 354K and AMoL's 353K), so he could have added to the length of his three to simply add more scenes. Also, remember that Fain did appear in the prologue to ToM, which set up his later appearance in AMoL (although I do think the similarity with Brandon's own Mistborn trilogy is worth noting - in the second book he had a character missing from chunks of the story simply because he had nothing to do, but following negative feedback he changed in the third book and gave the character small update scenes even though he still had nothing to do for significant chunks of the book. Here, he repeats the same mistake as he did in Mistborn 2). As for the Tinkers and their song, it was confirmed in interviews what many fans had already suspected - the Song is not a thing, it's a belief that has become distorted over time. There is no magical song that will bring back the Age of Legends, and even if they did find the Songs of Growing they wouldn't consider them the Song. Adding in further scenes to close off a few character arcs and give some closure to things that were left out is fine, but these details don't add more books. Unless you write a sequel series about the adventures of Valan Luca or something, but that's not really WoT. Either way, an extra 50-100 pages per book, or maybe just an extra 150-200 pages in the last book would have been nice to wrap things up a bit more neatly. I'm sure I could come up with more loose ends given time as well. (Like, Alivia being stronger than Nynaeve and Lanfear, but her only role in the Last Battle was to follow Cadsuane around and later arrange for Rand to get some money and a horse...you'd think uber-general Mat would have been able to utilize her to counter Demandred and Taim better?)
  8. Just finished the last book tonight. I did get a bit misty eyed at the end (and also when Egwene died) Likes: 1) The world was excellent - it had a rich and believable history that was worked into the story well. Most of the cultures were well done and distinct. The magic of channeling was good, and the saidin/saidar split with the taint was interesting. I felt Jordan brought it all to life. Well, as much as a fantasy world with trollocs and darkhounds can be brought to life. 2) The main characters were all people I cared about - Rand, Mat, Perrin, Egwene and Nynaeve, as well as Lan and Moiraine. 3) The scope of the story, with major characters all over the world playing important roles. 4) Many of the battle scenes were well done - I could hear the roar of the Asha'men channeling waves of destruction at Dumai's Wells, and I could feel the tension as the trollocs were attacking Emond's Field,etc. 5) While not all of them were as well developed as they should have been, I did enjoy some of the minor characters as well - Rodel Ituralde, Davrim Bashere, Androl, Valan Luca, Talmanes, etc 6) Since most of the series was a re-read to me, I enjoyed some of the storylines more a second time through. I liked what Egwene did at the White Tower while a prisoner there, while not liking much of her storyline when I initially read it. Dislikes:' 1) While I enjoyed the breakneck pace of the final book, I felt some of the storylines ended up being rushed and were not given as much attention as they deserved. I mean, Padan Fain appears out of nowhere 90% of the way through the book after not appearing in how many books before that? He didn't merit a few pages here and there in books 11, 12 and 13? He's the one that spurred Rand to leave the Two Rivers all the way back in book 1. I also mentioned a few others as well in my other thread - what happened with the Song the Tinkers were looking for? What happened with Elaida after she "performed" for Tuon after becoming damane? How about Valan Luca and his traveling show? The Sea Folk at the last battle just had a bunch of people holding the Bowl of the Winds? Nobody else? 2) The various characters falling in love didn't come across as believable - Nynaeve and Lan, Rand and Min/Elayne/Avi, Egwene and Gawyn and Galad/Berelain (though, I could say on the last one that they're both so attractive...) , At least with Mat & Tuon, they had extensive interaction with each other first. 3) The main characters went from country bumpkins from the Two Rivers who were terrified of a single trolloc, ran away shrieking from a single fade and who took what seemed many weeks just to cross Andor to suddenly being weapon masters who killed trollocs with ease and were more than a match for a fade, and also jetted around the continent via gateway a bit too quickly for me. (Was there much foreshadowing of Mat being a master of the staff until he whipped Galad and Gawyn together? At least with Rand, we saw him working extensively with Lan on sword training.) 4) The main characters often acting stupidly - Rand being taken by Elaida's embassy, Elayne constantly being captured/threatened ("oh Min said my babies will be born, I have no worries..."), Rand basically ignoring the Black Tower - sure, I know he had a lot of his plate, but man, he's the most powerful channeler in the world... he couldn't take five minutes a week to travel to & from the Black Tower via gateway? 5) Agreed on the Sharans at the end - would have liked to have seen more with the Shaido. I thought the Aiel in general were kind of given short shrift at the end, too. Feared and mighty warriors for the first several books, then superseded by the Seanchan? 6) Too many plotlines in the middle books took too long to resolve. 7) The female characters often seemed one dimensional, though I did like how Nynaeve and Egwene developed throughout. However, I'd say the "likes" far outweigh the dislikes.
  9. No. Structurally, there wasn't enough to even sustain three books. Whatever other problems there may have been, running out of pages was never one of them. Dragonmount only has a finite amount of lava - it was noted when it was used that it became less devastating with each use. Also, it's probably not a good idea to give that same idea to the rival enemy channelers, unless you're fine with having lava poured on your own troops (or maybe they open a Gateway to the bottom of the ocean and flood your back lines or something). I might disagree with that - I think they could have given us a bit more on Padan Fain in the previous two books - even if just a section of a chapter in each book. Seems kind of odd to pull him out at the very end after he wasn't in the previous few books. I thought they could have done a bit more with the Tinkers as well, instead of having them just show up and help behind the scenes, and maybe a few of them question their beliefs. Whatever happened to the song they were looking for? What about Valan Luca and his show? Was Elaida mentioned at all after that one encounter with Tuon in Ebou Dar after she had become damane? (was up late last night trying to finish the book, and just finished it now.) Maybe a few more POVs from the battlefields?
  10. I think most of the main characters deserve a spot as "new" heroes and heroines, especially Rand, Perrin, Mat, Egwene and Nynaeve.
  11. Interesting - I figured that in the week they spent gathering at the Fields of Merrilor and setting up their defenses, Androl, Elayne, etc could have said, "Hey, remember that time we dumped lava over a bunch of trollocs and killed thousands of them?"
  12. As I posted before when I joined the forum recently, I started the series probably about 20 years ago, then life got in the way for several years (marriage, divorce, remarriage, fatherhood, a few new jobs, etc) and I stopped somewhere around Path of Daggers. However, once I read that Brandon Sanderson had finished the series, I decided to tackle the series again, and I started off from the beginning early this year and have finally made it most of the way through A Memory of Light. I would also recommend the audiobooks if you get a chance - Michael Kramer and Kate Reading do a very good job, Kramer reading the male POVs and Reading the female POVs. I've listened to some very good audiobooks before, but I enjoy having a woman read the female POVs (it was a bit awkward hearing the gravel voiced, but otherwise excellent, octogenarian Roy Dotrice reading the sex scenes in A Song of Ice & Fire.) A few observations: 1) I'm really enjoying the breakneck pace of the book, and just got through the part where Egwene died taking out M'Hael. (Got a bit misty eyed when she died.) I'm a bit concerned about all the story lines being wrapped up in the last 15-20% of the book. 2) I can definitely tell the difference in writing styles - I've seen a few places where Sanderson slipped in more "modern" terms in the text than Jordan would have used. Just from glancing at the forums, I can tell some don't like Sanderson's style, but I think it's fine otherwise. Not as enjoyable as Jordan, but I wonder if he had four books to finish up the series instead of three if he would have been able to do more? 3) Was Androl mentioned before the last three books at all? I like his character, but it seems kind of odd to give him so much "screen time" the last three books after nary a mention before that where I can recall. Seems a bit out of place. Was he a Sanderson creation? 4) Why haven't more Aes Sedai & Asha'Men done what Androl did outside Cairhien - create a circle and opened a gateway to the lava inside Dragonmount?
  13. That was my impression as well - the initial waves of refugees that started the town expansion was due to the Seanchan invasion at Falme, no? So, the length of time from those initial refugees arriving was not long after the trolloc attack on the town. So, I'm guessing it was still a pretty good length of time before the last battle. Granted, it probably grew faster than it could have under "normal" circumstances, but Perrin was also ta'veren, so that probably helped out quite a bit.
  14. I think with Rand, Mat and Perrin all thinking that the other two were better with women than themselves is pretty honest and amusing in the beginning, especially in regards to young men. But, I also think that women thinking that all men are stupid troublemakers in need of a good ear-boxing is kind of simplistic at best. And, I know that his ta'veren nature had something to do with it, but three beautiful women falling in love with Rand and willingly sharing him with one another? Seems a bit of a stretch to me.
  15. Thanks Nikon and Ryrin above. I'm going through AMoL as quickly as possible - it's very fast paced and hard to stop. Also, I'd highly recommend the audiobooks read by Michael Kramer and Kate Reading. I have a long commute to work, so have passed the time by listening to audiobooks and both Kramer (doing the male POV chapters/sections) and Reading (doing the female POVs) are excellent. Most of the other long series' I've listened to have only had one narrator (A Song of Ice & Fire with Roy Dotrice and the Harry Potter books with Jim Dale come to mind). It was good to have the female POVs voiced by, well, a woman.
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