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DRAGONMOUNT

A WHEEL OF TIME COMMUNITY

fionwe1987

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  1. Probably not. Yours must have had many sections blacked out. I'd search for the originals and read them with an unbiased mind.
  2. I am talking about this post of yours. You cannot ignore facts of the series just because you think the authors should have written things differently.
  3. This is kind of meaningless as a statement. RJ was the writer. If he saw Egwene as the best channeler among the women, she IS, since she's his creation. Hardly meaningless as there was a push to make her the best. So to compare the others and trying to say so and so is the weakest link is pointless as Egwene was made to be the perfect one who was powerful, good with weaves, learning new weaves, dream world etc... Where the others had strengths and weaknesses. So? You can interpret this as you like, but the fact is this is RJ's work. He hardly made Egwene perfect, but in his own words: Excerpt From: Robert Jordan, Harriet McDougal, Alan Romanczuk, and Maria Simons. “The Wheel of Time Companion.” iBooks. The explanation for why Egwene is good is simple: she puts the most work into it, seeks the best teachers, and gives it her all when asked to learn anything. We can basically use RJ did it or that's how RJ wanted it as answer for almost every topic. Yes, which is why it is rather bizarre that you complain about it here. Egwene IS the best of the three at channeling. Saying "RJ did it" doesn't change that.
  4. This is kind of meaningless as a statement. RJ was the writer. If he saw Egwene as the best channeler among the women, she IS, since she's his creation. Hardly meaningless as there was a push to make her the best. So to compare the others and trying to say so and so is the weakest link is pointless as Egwene was made to be the perfect one who was powerful, good with weaves, learning new weaves, dream world etc... Where the others had strengths and weaknesses. So? You can interpret this as you like, but the fact is this is RJ's work. He hardly made Egwene perfect, but in his own words: Excerpt From: Robert Jordan, Harriet McDougal, Alan Romanczuk, and Maria Simons. “The Wheel of Time Companion.” iBooks. The explanation for why Egwene is good is simple: she puts the most work into it, seeks the best teachers, and gives it her all when asked to learn anything.
  5. This is kind of meaningless as a statement. RJ was the writer. If he saw Egwene as the best channeler among the women, she IS, since she's his creation.
  6. The "weak link", such as it is, is actually Nynaeve. RJ is on record saying that as of CoT, Elayne and Egwene would pass the test to become Aes Sedai easily, while Nynaeve would struggle. Cadsuane's assessment of Nynaeve's channeling skill, miraculous with Healing but dismal at anything else, also matches this. It isn't that Nynaeve can't be good, but she's just never bothered. She can copy a weave just seeing it once, but so can Elayne, Egwene and Aviendha. What sets the others apart is how much work they put into learning a lot, whereas Nynaeve's focus was always Healing. Elayne, while never matching Egwene's sheer speed, dexterity and innovation, was never shown to be a slouch in the One Power department. She was a few levels weaker only because of the fact that she hadn't been forced to the same extent Egwene was. And we know she wasn't weak in any of the Five Powers either, since making ter'angreal needs good strength in Earth and Fire, and we know Elayne is good with Air and Water because of her weather abilities, and we've never seen her struggle with Spirit. End of the day, they all had different focuses, skills and abilities. Egwene's were the broadest and she made the best use of them, but that was also because she was the best student of the lot, who focussed on learning everything she could.
  7. As I remember, Slayer ran away from Egwene, Nynaeve and Elayne. And its not just me saying Egwene is in the same weight class as Perrin, even Brandon says so: Also, its worth remembering it isn't just wolf-brothers that get to learn from wolves: That basically negates any innate differences between Dreamwalkers and Wolfbrothers. They are humans who enter the Dream. They can learn from other Dreamwalkers or Wolves, but they're not fundamentally different in how they approach the Dream.
  8. This, at least, is good writing. The best writers use said, and then let the context of the dialogue, and the words spoken themselves, take care of the rest. As for what the OP said, yes. Antiseptic and clinical are good descriptions of Sanderson's dialogue. People quote lines, don't have realistic conversations, when he writes.
  9. Like he was relying on his hammer. What is your point? Should Egwene have sent a weave of Fire at him, along with the certainty that it would burn him, are you saying Perrin would have had an easier time against it than if she shot an arrow at him? She was shocked that he stopped Balefire from a non-Dreamer. She was only surprised he pushed back her weave of Air, and her ropes. But Brandon said both those things were because she wasn't trying, and had no idea Perrin would be able to resist. If you think someone strong enough in the Dream to snap the mind of an opponent wouldn't give Perrin trouble with her weaves if she was trying to kill him, you're simply delusional.
  10. But that was uniquely a feature of Perrin's personality. If Egwene had been a Wolfsister, she would have jumped at the chance to learn new abilities, just as she did when she learned she was a channeler, or a Dreamwalker. In fact, if we go based on acceptance and feeling natural, Egwene has Perrin beat by a mile. She jumped into TAR, discovered several principles on her own, and once she got teachers, soaked whatever they taught as fast as was possible. We never see her question TAR, or feel it is unnatural for her. Scared of it at first, yes, but if you read those quotes she is also addicted to going back. I don't know. This was very much a late series introduction. Firstly... what is to say Dreamwalkers aren't naturals with instinct? It IS a Talent they are born with, after all. Secondly... we know for certain that TAR is about a strong sense of self, and also about how creatively you use its malleability. The first part the wolves have, but Egwene's confrontation with Mesaana, and the Wise One's subsequent dialogue shows that she has it in spades too. Certainly, we've seen no one else resist a change so much that it snapped their opponent's brain. As for creative uses of TAR, all the humans have been shown to be way better at this than any wolf we've seen. Even Perrin does better here than the wolves. I fail to see how not. The Power is what drives all of Creation. Why is TAR exempt from this? And anyway, if Rand's balefire can make it so TAR cannot repair the damage and go back to normal, and Moghedien can use the OP to simply eject a soul from TAR, I fail to see how we can say the OP doesn't have anything to do with TAR. Like in the real world, it can cause dramatic effects in TAR. And skilled Dreamwalkers can combine it with their TAR skills to achieve things no wolf can imagine. Is it? Even Brandon didn't write it so. He has Egwene say that some things are indeed easier to achieve with the Power than by imagining it happening (though frankly that seems silly to me). That's like saying knowing to use the hammer was a weakness for Perrin, since he was relying on something of the real world instead of the mechanics of TAR! Look, TAR allows you to use your real world knowledge in very flexible ways. Whether you choose to use a weave or a hammer, the real thing that matters is how strongly you can project your own idea of reality. Perrin was easily able to deflect Balefire from a person weak in the dream (though even that contradicts the effects Rand's balefire had on TAR), but what if Egwene had thrown the weave at him with a real intention to kill? Or Lanfear? I doubt he'd have had any easier a time than if they'd used a hammer instead. The advantage of the One Power is that you can do (and imagine) even more things, some of which are invisible. There is Compulsion, but also Healing, wards, invisible webs of Air, tiny flames. Some of these things you don't even have to actually weave, but since channelers deal with these things regularly, they can imagine these things with far more ease than non-channelers, who resort to more common things like hammers, bows and arrows, and so on. Nothing stops Perrin from surprising Slayer with a burst of fire, or a collapsing wall. But he never does it, because it just isn't in the way he thinks. Egwene, on the other hand, can do so. She imagines walls, fires, light, darkness, stupidity and so on. Heck, as far back as tFoH, she way more successfully stopped the pain of her very real welts from affecting her. Her created Bela was also far more lifelike than Perrin's created Hopper, though that might be an effect of her having been physically in TAR. Look, 11 books of evidence shows humans manipulating TAR far more cleverly and powerfully than wolves. We knew dead wolves went to TAR as far back as tSR, yet no one assumed that meant anything for TAR skills. Brandon tried to change some of that, maybe because he didn't think of TAR quite the same way as RJ did, but I prefer to trust what we've seen. And then there's Brandon's own semi-retraction, where he said Perrin and Egwene were more or less equal anyway, which makes no sense if being wolf-like is some advantage. All in all, I'd be more inclined to think the much more clever and inventive humans would do better in TAR.
  11. I'm not sure about this. While Wolves are natural inhabitants of TAR, so are Dreamwalkers. It isn't like Egwene had to be trained to access TAR. She could do so naturally, and would have done so eventually without any help. Wolves may go there when they are dead, but humans visit by accident all the time, and leave behind their dreams and nightmares. And as we see from Birgette, just because you go into TAR on death doesn't mean that a Dreamwalker cannot easily best you. Neither wolves nor Heroes seem very good at manipulating TAR. They're fine in surviving it and being themselves in it, but humans, especially Dreamwalkers, are far more adept at manipulating it. Take this simple example: Perrin's toughest training is all about keeping his personal identity inside a nightmare and not giving into it. Those same nightmares are routinely dismissed to nothing by Wise Ones and Egwene. The why of it seems simple: Nightmares are human thoughts and fears superimposed on TAR. Humans are best at dealing with it. Then there's another advantage Egwene has: she can fold a part of TAR into her own dream, creating a Dreamshard. Perrin just can't do that, and within Egwene's Dreamshard (should they ever have come to blows), he would be quite helpless. Lastly, there is the OP. Frankly, the Brandon introduced concept that the OP totally doesn't matter in TAR always seemed weird to me. The OP is as much a part of the real world as anything else. While Perrin (and Bair) are better able to deny the reality of a weave in TAR, that doesn't mean it is effortless. Perrin can't wish away an arrow used by Slayer without effort. Same is the case with weaves used by a trained Dreamwalker. And that doesn't account for weaves he just can't see. As Lanfear so easily proved, Perrin is very susceptible to hidden weaves. Things he can't see, he can't fight. The OP is an enormous advantage in TAR.
  12. The Amazon preview is of the final book. But Seaine herself explains why she doesn't feel comfortable standing up to Saerin. They are doing something that is illegal, and thus outside of the Hall's authority. So the fact that Sitters did not expect deference from other Sitters was set aside, since they couldn't very well claim Sitter's precedence in something like this. As for Pevara and Javindhra, they were about Ajah business. Sure, Pevara was placed at the head of the expedition, but it isn't like she, Tarna and Javindhra were stripped of their positions. Nor was what they were doind against any law. So Pevara likely continued to extend the courtesy due to Javindhra as a Sitter, even though she was so much stronger. There is some logic :) But I feel that 11 levels are enough to listen what the higher have to say even for ordering.. It is explicitly stated that what your strength is doesn't matter once you have a position of authority like Sitter granted to you. For instance, Moiraine notes that Duhara would have to obey her orders based on strength, but when she was Keeper that didn't matter one bit.
  13. The Amazon preview is of the final book. But Seaine herself explains why she doesn't feel comfortable standing up to Saerin. They are doing something that is illegal, and thus outside of the Hall's authority. So the fact that Sitters did not expect deference from other Sitters was set aside, since they couldn't very well claim Sitter's precedence in something like this. As for Pevara and Javindhra, they were about Ajah business. Sure, Pevara was placed at the head of the expedition, but it isn't like she, Tarna and Javindhra were stripped of their positions. Nor was what they were doind against any law. So Pevara likely continued to extend the courtesy due to Javindhra as a Sitter, even though she was so much stronger. Incidentally, just did a search, and Seaine is level 17(5), so 3 levels below Peavara, Yukiri and Saerin.
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