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The Typo/Errata Thread


Luckers
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Perrin, as far as I know, has only ever known Tel'aran'rhiod as the wolf dream. Yet in ToM, part of the way into the book, it is being referenced as the World of Dreams and later as Tel'aran'rhiod when in Perrin's POV.

 

He does know the names "World of Dreams" and "Tel'aran'rhiod". Moraine told him about them at one point (tDR, Chapter 53) and suggested that the wolf dream was the same thing. He thinks about that again later in tSR, Chapter 28. And that book was actually the last time he did much wolf dreaming before ToM. He only had a few brief visits in the interim.

Edited by didymos
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There are a litany of typos throughout this book.

 

This book? More like "Every WoT book ever." I think the ebook editions even added some new ones. But yeah, ToM has its fair share.

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There are a litany of typos throughout this book. From misspelled words to words such as "a" or "the" missing which makes the sentence very odd. I'm about halfway through the book, and I've really grown tired of them all. Shouldn't the editing process for such a great series catch most of these?

 

lit·a·ny (libreve.giftprime.gifn-emacr.gif)n. pl. lit·a·nies 1. A liturgical prayer consisting of a series of petitions recited by a leader alternating with fixed responses by the congregation.2. A repetitive or incantatory recital.

 

Also, it is singular, so if you really had intended to use this word (which I think you didn't), it would be 'There is a litany of typos...'

 

Just sayin.

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There are a litany of typos throughout this book. From misspelled words to words such as "a" or "the" missing which makes the sentence very odd. I'm about halfway through the book, and I've really grown tired of them all. Shouldn't the editing process for such a great series catch most of these?

 

lit·a·ny (libreve.giftprime.gifn-emacr.gif)n. pl. lit·a·nies 1. A liturgical prayer consisting of a series of petitions recited by a leader alternating with fixed responses by the congregation.2. A repetitive or incantatory recital.

 

Also, it is singular, so if you really had intended to use this word (which I think you didn't), it would be 'There is a litany of typos...'

 

Just sayin.

 

Um...

litany, n. [2.] b. A succesion or catalogue of phenomena, esp. unfortunate events.

 

and:

 

lit·a·ny noun \ˈli-tə-nē, ˈlit-nē\ 2 c : a sizable series or set <a litany of problems>

What do I win?

 

But hey: good call on the verb agreement.

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There are a litany of typos throughout this book. From misspelled words to words such as "a" or "the" missing which makes the sentence very odd. I'm about halfway through the book, and I've really grown tired of them all. Shouldn't the editing process for such a great series catch most of these?

 

lit·a·ny (libreve.giftprime.gifn-emacr.gif)n. pl. lit·a·nies 1. A liturgical prayer consisting of a series of petitions recited by a leader alternating with fixed responses by the congregation.2. A repetitive or incantatory recital.

 

Also, it is singular, so if you really had intended to use this word (which I think you didn't), it would be 'There is a litany of typos...'

 

Just sayin.

 

I used litany right, but you are correct about is and are.

 

If I had a team of editors, though, you'd think I wouldn't make any grammatical errors.

Edited by sarjente
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I still have issue with the timelines, specifically, Mat & Verin's.

 

BS said Verin met with Matt a month before VoG, and then Verin's letter said she went to Egwene the very next day. That seems off to me.

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BS said that? Check with him about that, it doesn't seem like it could be right, he may have gotten the timeline mixed up himself.

 

I remember there being discussion of that, that BS did mess up the timings a bit during an interview at least, and perhaps in tGS. I seem to recall a comment that they didn't discover the problem in time to fix it in tGS 1st run paperbacks.

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Also, if there was a way to overcome that weakness, you'd think Moghedien would have mentioned it here:

 

"You brainless fool," Moghedien sobbed, shaking Nynaeve's skirt with both hands as if wanting to shake Nynaeve. "It does not matter how brave you are. We are linked, but you contribute nothing the way you are. Not a shred. It is my strength, and your madness. They are here in the flesh, not dreaming! They are using things you have never dreamed of! They will destroy us if we stay!"

 

I believe Moghedion meant the one-sided link of the a'dam. Nynaeve, acting as a sul'dam, contributed nothing of her own strength to the circle.

I'm not so sure that's true. The a'dam functions as a link with the sul'dam in control; the sul'dam usually do not contribute because they have not actually started channeling, but there is nothing to say that they cannot.

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I believe that Moghedien was referring to Nynaeve contributing nothing because she was blocked, not because she held the a'dam. Doubtless sul'dam could add their channeling to the involuntary ring of the a'dam if they wished to do so.

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Kind of nit-picky, but page 378 Gawyn thinks of Silviana as a Red, instead of as the Keeper.

 

I can see how it might be an annoying inconsistency between speech patterns but the Keeper retains her Ajah when she is raised so it is correct. Not to mention that (I think! Its been several months since I read tGS.) Gawyn was absent when Silviana was raised so in his POV he might still think of her as a Red and not really as the Keeper. Plus, Egwene notes several times that he still hasn't accepted her as Amyrlin so it seems right at this point that he wouldn't accept her chosen Keeper either.

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Not only that, but the Keeper actually wears a narrow stole in the color of the Ajah from which she was raised, a constant reminder to all who see her.

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P 530 "Now, you're sure you can't create gateways at all? Not even to other points nearby, inside the effected area?" Pretty sure that should be "affected", though people argue endlessly over usage.

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Not to hate or anything because I absolutely loovee the book, but I did notice that the english in some of the book was a lil off... I mean there were one or two mistakes with pronouns and mispellings, and one sentence which actually didn't even make sense like the word order was all wrong... Anyhow, I am pbly overexaggerating but I mean a published book cannot have that many errors. I guess the book might was pbly rushed but I dnt think this is acceptable...

 

This was my impression I would pbly have to read the book again maybe i was just tired when i read the book...

 

edit: i guess I can also not spell but I am not a writer :P

Edited by forzainternl
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US edition: Page 533

 

The viewpoint seems to switch from Faile to Perrin briefly, then back to Faile in this chapter.

 

The chapter follows Faile as she prepares for Perrin's trial. Perrin and Faile exchange words, and that's when the viewpoint shifts, or Faile can read Perrin's mind.

 

"He suddenly remembered his vision from the wolf dream. Sheep running in front of wolves. He'd thought himself one of the wolves. But could he have been wrong?

"Light! He had been wrong about that. He knew what it meant, now."

 

And then they talk more, and the viewpoint returns to Faile.

 

Yeh I also noticed this. Maybe there's a paragraph break missing, in any case you are right. I don't think it's really correct to have 2 viewpoints in the same piece...

 

To be honest I hope that TOR gives Brandon more time to finish the book properly because these are serious mistakes for a book. First book I read with such obvious mistakes :((((((((....

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P 530 "Now, you're sure you can't create gateways at all? Not even to other points nearby, inside the effected area?" Pretty sure that should be "affected", though people argue endlessly over usage.

 

Yeah, it should be 'affected' all right. There isn't really a usage dispute on this though. It's basically just a spelling error.

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O.K., Peter, here we go. I've only checked this thread, but these are all new.

US ed., counting all partial paragraphs

 

p. 46.2 often did plump foreign (I read the word plump as a verb and it confused me the first three times)

 

90.4 lighting should be lightning

 

94.9 the winter felt worn away (maybe it's just me, but felt reads as a verb and could be clarified with felt on it or its felt or something)

 

125.14 but it('s) what I'm doing

 

202.15 (probably should clarify which beatings Egwene refers to: from Wise Ones or Aes Sedai)

 

210.12 the remaining seals upon the (on sounds better than upon, which is used again in the same sentence)

 

211.2 I think removing both instances of the word right in the sentence beginning "But she generally did see. . ." reads much better.

 

248.7 I would (have) liked

 

268.4 Ituralde turned (and) looked

 

305.2 anything specific but (should be except, I think) the number

 

382.7 Your body and your child (children)

 

383.13 What are we do to with you

 

388.12 to tell you that that

 

398.8 Perrin grew caught up (sounds wrong. . .became?)

 

403.4 No longer be a symbol (It's no longer a symbol?)

 

408.8 No, (I) guess that

 

417.5 Byar said, nudging. . . (Byar said what?)

 

430.2 There, she sat quietly. (misplaced comma)

 

434.14 in relative secret (secrecy?)

 

512.13 sparking should probably be sparkling

 

574.11 position he('d) been

 

583.10 Failure needed (need) always be

 

604.8 Here's the rifling/riffling thing again. Has this been changed in some modern dictionary to reflect common pronunciation?

 

662.9 Caemlyn is already is buzzing

 

662.15 in an inn (at sounds better)

 

669.9 Galad said (,) bowing with an

 

675.8 fountains flowed now, and though

 

728.4 When the Aiel had destroyed (better without the had)

 

739.8 left you to prison (unless this is intended to sound archaic)

 

762.10 Elayne started, the(n) stepped closer

 

784.13 set up a little too high up to

 

788.9 the flute form his lips

 

827.5 didn't you once tell me once

 

827.8 Isn't going to happen (intended?)

 

829.7 rifled/riffled (my dictionary says it's riffled)

 

852.5 Until after Malkier fell (Yes, I caught one in the glossary! Can't believe it. . .)

 

Do I win a prize?

 

I managed to enjoy this book immensely despite taking notes. It's only because I care. :wub:

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O.K., Peter, here we go. I've only checked this thread, but these are all new.

US ed., counting all partial paragraphs

 

p. 46.2 often did plump foreign (I read the word plump as a verb and it confused me the first three times)

 

90.4 lighting should be lightning

 

94.9 the winter felt worn away (maybe it's just me, but felt reads as a verb and could be clarified with felt on it or its felt or something)

 

125.14 but it('s) what I'm doing

 

202.15 (probably should clarify which beatings Egwene refers to: from Wise Ones or Aes Sedai)

 

210.12 the remaining seals upon the (on sounds better than upon, which is used again in the same sentence)

 

211.2 I think removing both instances of the word right in the sentence beginning "But she generally did see. . ." reads much better.

 

248.7 I would (have) liked

 

268.4 Ituralde turned (and) looked

 

305.2 anything specific but (should be except, I think) the number

 

382.7 Your body and your child (children)

 

383.13 What are we do to with you

 

388.12 to tell you that that

 

398.8 Perrin grew caught up (sounds wrong. . .became?)

 

403.4 No longer be a symbol (It's no longer a symbol?)

 

408.8 No, (I) guess that

 

417.5 Byar said, nudging. . . (Byar said what?)

 

430.2 There, she sat quietly. (misplaced comma)

 

434.14 in relative secret (secrecy?)

 

512.13 sparking should probably be sparkling

 

574.11 position he('d) been

 

583.10 Failure needed (need) always be

 

604.8 Here's the rifling/riffling thing again. Has this been changed in some modern dictionary to reflect common pronunciation?

 

662.9 Caemlyn is already is buzzing

 

662.15 in an inn (at sounds better)

 

669.9 Galad said (,) bowing with an

 

675.8 fountains flowed now, and though

 

728.4 When the Aiel had destroyed (better without the had)

 

739.8 left you to prison (unless this is intended to sound archaic)

 

762.10 Elayne started, the(n) stepped closer

 

784.13 set up a little too high up to

 

788.9 the flute form his lips

 

827.5 didn't you once tell me once

 

827.8 Isn't going to happen (intended?)

 

829.7 rifled/riffled (my dictionary says it's riffled)

 

852.5 Until after Malkier fell (Yes, I caught one in the glossary! Can't believe it. . .)

 

Do I win a prize?

 

I managed to enjoy this book immensely despite taking notes. It's only because I care. :wub:

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Wow, good catches! I had post-its with me for a while, then despite me good intentions, I got caught up in READING again instead of checking and fell behind. Third times a charm....

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Peter is having login issues, and wanted someone to post this here:

 

Rifle and riffle are two different verbs. Rifle means to search thoroughly, ransack. Riffle means to leaf through hastily or cursorily. I do believe riffle is onomatopoeia. It dates from 1754. Rifle's ransack definition is its oldest, from the 14th century. Oxford Online more or less gives rifle as one definition of riffle, which annoys me. Merriam-Webster keeps them separate.
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Wow, good catches! I had post-its with me for a while, then despite me good intentions, I got caught up in READING again instead of checking and fell behind. Third times a charm....

 

I only managed to report as many as I did because I can now post to Dragonmount from my phone.

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I saw those errors myself, like when in Return to Arad Doman or whatever the chapter title was, Iralin was spelled Irilin in the middle of the second to last page. I think, that like Books Seven through Ten, Book Thirteen went through perhaps a too short editing process-or perhaps they simply didn't look for grammar errors. I confess however that I read the book so quickly that I only caught most of these on the second, third and up runs through the book.

The error that most stood out to me(of course, I ran through this thread quickly, so I apologize to anyone who already mentioned it) was the timeline errors. RJ always did a methodical step-by-step chronological synchronization. That was not the case here. Men Dream Here dealt with the events in the last chapter of Book Twelve, but from Perrin's pov in the wolf dream. It makes no sense for it to have occurred after The Veins of Gold. Nor did the wolves reactions have the flavor of this dream being a PostTelling. Yet the third chapter Apples First dealt with the aftermath of Rand's epiphany in Book Twelve, hundreds of pages before Men Dream Here The book was riddled with such dischronologies.

 

And I loved it. I loved it as I have not loved a Wheel of Time book since Lord of Chaos. I dare say this is the best one since that vaunted Book Six: They have caged Shadowkiller. "Kneel and swear to the Lord Dragon, or you will be knelt." Methinks the series peaked there, and methought that peak 'twould ne'er again be matched.

Methought wrong. Eleven was good, Twelve was at least as worthy, but Book Thirteen could very well be the best of them all, warts and all. Harriet picked RJ's successor well.

To sum up, it didn't suck, period.

Edited by Asgard Thorin
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The error that most stood out to me(of course, I ran through this thread quickly, so I apologize to anyone who already mentioned it) was the timeline errors. RJ always did a methodical step-by-step chronological synchronization. That was not the case here. Men Dream Here dealt with the events in the last chapter of Book Twelve, but from Perrin's pov in the wolf dream. It makes no sense for it to have occurred after The Veins of Gold.

Kinda like how it made no sense for us to see the Cleansing from everyone else's POVs in the first half of Crossroads of Twilight? Honestly, it's not that difficult to keep up with with so many clues as to how each plotline relates to the others in the timeline (this being, of course, the most major one).

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Not sure this really belongs here, but the manner of firing the dragon (p. 467) is incorrect. A shell should not have an external fuse that's lit before it's placed into the barrel of the cannon. That would make the shell practically worthless, because it would be impossible to time the explosion that way, what with the need to aim and the discrepancies in the burn time for gunpowder in that technological era. Also, misfires were fairly common, and then you'd have a lit shell inside the barrel with no way to get it out, which would destroy the gun and probably kill the entire crew.

 

When the packed gunpowder at the end of the barrel is ignited (which should really be done with a primer instead of a torch), it creates a large enough flame to ignite the fuse, which should be set into the shell instead of protruding out from it. That flame would set off the fuse right next to the shell, anyway, making any extra fuse superfluous. Finally, there should have been at least some mention of the recoil, as those things have a hell of a kickback.

It is mostly correct, but the fuse isn't lit by hand, the discharge lights the fuse, but fuses were used and cut to length by skilled gunners to get various effects, such as explosion deep in ranks, air burst for cannister rounds, etc. Fuses have been lit by hand, but this was usually reserved for mortars in the 1700's. The short stubby barrels allowed for the round to be lowered in, lit, then the propellant charge in the mortar to be lit. For some reason if one failed to fire, there were various tools for removing the lit fuse, corscrew-like implements, picks, etc, depending on the decade, maker, country, and so forth. Misfires were not too common as slow matches were directly applied to charges of powder through flashpans and touch-holes. I am certain that RJ was well versed in this topic and left extensive notes as both a Gentleman of the Citadel as well as a Historian and Combat veteran.

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