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The Ogier Architect's Museum!


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Those are so breath-taking!!  I have always dreamed of visiting China and Japan someday so I can see them up close.  I wish they still built like that today.  :)

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Todays entry into the museum is the quaking aspen grove in Quaking Aspen, Colorado. Botanists used to believe that the giant sequoia was the largest plant on earth. Recently, they have determined that a quaking aspen grove is in fact one single plant organism, the largest growing plant on Earth.

 

rob-tilley-quaking-aspen-and-sumac-routt-national-forest-colorado-usa.jpg

 

It is called "quaking" aspen because of how the leaves quake every which way when the wind blows. The grove looks like a bunch of wriggling toddlers, in the wind.

 

reb610_aspen_lg.jpg

 

Cow_Parsnip_and_Quaking_Aspen_Colorado_1600x1.jpg

 

quaking-aspen-1.JPG

 

 

Quaking Aspens get quite tall, too.

 

p_2518886.jpg

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Well, they all use the same root system so yeah they are kind of all one tree in a way.  Its just incredible how something so vast can survive for this long!  Thank you for those pics Cherise, they really are amazing!  ;D

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Wait....so all the trees are actually one tree?

 

 

Yup, just as Kelly said, the whole grove uses the same root system, so really a whole grove is all one plant. I lost the hotlink to the first pic I posted. That one showed a grove covering dozens of square miles. It really drove home how large a plant the quaking aspen is!

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  • 4 weeks later...

New entry to the museum! I found my favorite of the pictures that I took at Stonehenge.

 

v8k1i.jpg

 

I took this in 1988 on Shortest Day. Longest Day is the only other day of the year when they allow tourists to be among the stones like this. I don't know these people. They are just the other people who were on the bus that Mom and I took up to the stones, from the ticket office.

 

I heard recently that standing a stone up is something ancient people did to commemorate a major event. As we posted in the original Stonehenge entry here at the Ogier Architect's Museum, the purpose of Stonehenge is a mystery.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Ogier Origins Theory~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I think Robert Jordan wants us to imagine that

we ogier were the architects

of all the mysterious architectures in our world.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Hey people.

 

Im Reyoru, new to the site and the org, but I'm sooo glad that this thread is around! I really like what everyones contributed, and can't wait to contribute myself. You see I'm a Coptic Orthodox Christian and am passionate about ancient churches and their architecture, old monasteries etc. and would love to post some pics and long boring rants  ;D. Im also interested in all and any other architecture styles, etc. Look forward to posting but am real busy atm (applying to study medicine at Oxford)

 

Nice to meet you Ogier  ;)

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Welcome Reyoru, to the peace of the stedding and to the contemplation of the museum!

 

I am certain that I speak for all of the ogier when I say that we look forward to your additions to the museum!

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Ok guys here goes:  :)

 

The Temples of Karnak

Ok just a little about the Temples of Karnak (courtesy of Wikipedia for the most part). For a start they are located some 500 km south of Cairo, in Egypt. The area around Karnak was the ancient Egyptian Ipet-isut ("The Most Selected of Places") and the main place of worship of the Theban Triad with the god Amun as its head. It is part of the monumental city of Thebes. The Karnak complex takes its name from the nearby (and partly surrounded) modern village of el-Karnak, some 2.5 km north of Luxor.

 

It is made up of a huge complex of temples, chapels, pylons and other buildings, notably the Great Temple of Amen and a massive structure begun by Pharoah Amenhotep III (ca. 1391-1351 BC). The complex is a vast open-air museum and the largest ancient religious site in the world. It is probably the second most visited historical site in Egypt, second only to the Giza Pyramids near Cairo. It consists of four main parts (precincts), of which only the largest, the Precinct of Amun-Re, is open to the general public. The term Karnak is often understood as being the Precinct of Amun-Re only, as this is the only part most visitors normally see. The three other parts, the Precinct of Montu, the Precinct of Mut and the dismantled Temple of Amenhotep IV, are closed to the public. There also are a few smaller temples and sanctuaries located outside the enclosing walls of the four main parts, as well as several avenues of human and ram-headed sphinxes connecting the Precinct of Mut, the Precinct of Amun-Re, and Luxor Temple.

 

The key difference between Karnak and most of the other temples and sites in Egypt is the length of time over which it was developed and used. Construction of temples started in the Middle Kingdom and continued through to Ptolemaic times. Approximately thirty pharaohs contributed to the buildings, enabling it to reach a size, complexity, and diversity not seen elsewhere. Few of the individual features of Karnak are unique, but the size and number of features are overwhelming.

 

One of most famous aspects of Karnak, is the Hypostyle Hall in the Precinct of Amun-Re, a hall area of 50,000 sq ft (5,000 m2) with 134 massive columns arranged in 16 rows. 122 of these columns are 10 meters tall, and the other 12 are 21 meters tall with a diameter of over three meters. The architraves on top of these columns weigh an estimated 70 tons. These architraves may have been lifted to these heights using levers. This would be an extremely time-consuming process and would also require great balance to get to such great heights. A common alternative theory is that there were large ramps made of sand mud brick or stone and the stones were towed up the ramps. If they used stone for the ramps they would have been able to build the ramps with much less material. The top of the ramps would presumably have either wooden tracks or cobblestones to tow the megaliths on. There is an unfinished pillar in an out of the way location that indicated how they finished it. The finish carving was done after the drums were put in place.

 

The history of the Karnak complex is largely the history of Thebes. The city does not appear to have been of any significance before the Eleventh Dynasty, and any temple building here would have been relatively small and unimportant, with any shrines being dedicated to the early god of Thebes, Montu. The earliest artifact found in the area of the temple is a small, eight-side from the Eleventh Dynasty, which mentions Amun-Re. Amun (sometimes called Amen) was long the local god of Thebes. He was identified with the Ram and the Goose. The Egyptian meaning of Amen is "hidden" or the "hidden god". [4]

 

Major construction work in the Precinct of Amun-Re took place during the Eighteenth dynasty. Thutmose I erected an enclosure wall connecting the Fourth and Fifth pylons, which comprise the earliest part of the temple still standing in situ. Construction of the Hypostyle Hall may have also began during the eighteenth dynasty, though most building was undertaken under Seti I and Ramesses II. Almost every Pharaoh added something to the temple. Merenptah commemorated his victories over the Sea Peoples on the walls of the Cachette Court, the start of the processional route to the Luxor Temple.

 

The last major change to Precinct of Amun-Re's layout was the addition of the first pylon and the massive enclosure walls that surround the whole Precinct, both constructed by Nectanebo I.

 

In 323 AD, Constantine the Great recognised the Christian religion, and in 356 ordered the closing of pagan temples throughout the empire. Karnak was by this time mostly abandoned, and Christian churches were founded amongst the ruins, the most famous example of this is the reuse of the Festival Hall of Thutmose III's central hall, were painted decorations of saints and Coptic inscriptions can still be seen.

 

Thebes’ exact placement was unknown in medieval Europe, though both Herodotus and Strabo give the exact location of Thebes and how long up the Nile one must travel to reach it. Maps of Egypt, based on the 2nd century Claudius Ptolemaeus' mammoth work Geographia, have been circling in Europe since the late 14th century, all of them showing Thebes’ (Diospolis) location. Despite this, several European authors of the 15th and 16th century who visited only Lower Egypt and published their travel accounts, like Joos van Ghistele or André Thévet, put Thebes in or close to Memphis.

 

 

Photograph of the temple complex taken in 1914The Karnak temple complex is first described by an unknown Venetian in 1589, though his account relates no name for the complex. This account, housed in the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze, is the first known European mention since ancient Greek and Roman writers of a whole range of monuments in Upper Egypt and Nubia, including Karnak, Luxor temple, Colossi of Memnon, Esna, Edfu, Kom Ombo, Philae and others.

 

Karnak ("Carnac") as a village name, and name of the complex, is first attested in 1668, when two capuchin missionary brothers Protais and Charles François d'Orléans travelled though the area. Protais’ writing about their travel was published by Melchisédech Thévenot (Relations de divers voyages curieux, 1670s-1696 editions) and Johann Michael Vansleb (The Present State of Egypt, 1678).

 

The first drawing of Karnak is found in Paul Lucas' travel account of 1704, (Voyage du Sieur paul Lucas au Levant). It is rather inaccurate, and can be quite confusing to modern eyes. Lucas travelled in Egypt during 1699-1703. The drawing shows a mixture of the Precinct of Amun-Re and the Precinct of Montu, based on a complex confined by the three huge Ptolemaic gateways of Ptolemy III Euergetes / Ptolemy IV Philopator, and the massive 113m long, 43m high and 15m thick, first Pylon of the Precinct of Amun-Re.

 

Karnak was visited and described in succession by Claude Sicard and his travel companion Pierre Laurent Pincia (1718 and 1720-21), Granger (1731), Frederick Louis Norden (1737-38), Richard Pococke (1738), James Bruce (1769), Charles-Nicolas-Sigisbert Sonnini de Manoncourt (1777), William George Browne (1792-93), and finally by a number of scientists of the Napoleon expedition, including Vivant Denon, during 1798-1799. Claude-Étienne Savary describes the complex rather detailed in his work of 1785; especially in light that it is a fictional account of a pretended journey to Upper Egypt, composed out of information from other travellers. Savary did visit Lower Egypt in 1777-78, and published a work about that too.

 

First off, heres a map of the place:

Temple_of_amun_karnak.jpg

 

Quite annoyingly, my camera ran out of batteries WELL before the end of the tour, but I'll post the photos I have and try to explain as best as I can remember

 

Photo 1 - The Corridor of Sphinxes 1

DSC00696.jpg

The Corridor of Sphinxes in located in the Main Precint of Amun-Re (the biggest of the 4 areas of the Karnak, and the only one that the public can get into).

 

Photo 2 - The Corridor of Sphinxes 2

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00701.jpg[/img]

All of the Sphinxes in the Corridor (the entrance leading to the First Pylon) were originally places in the entrance to the 2nd Pylon, but at some point they were moved aside (kinda like a pharaoh revamping the place).

 

Photo 3 - The Corridor of Sphinxes 3

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00702.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 4 - The Corridor of Sphinxes 4

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00704.jpg[/img]

Now for some reason, this is the only sphinx in the corridor, that has a pharaoh inset, rather than just the typical rams horns (although broken off). Any ideas anyone? Some Ogier interference maybe?  ;D

 

Photo 5 - The Cult Terrace

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00703.jpg[/img]

Right, so after passing The Corridor of Pharaohs, the main entrance is the Cult Terrace. Here it is in all its glory.

 

Photo 6 - The Great Forecourt

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00695.jpg[/img]

Right, go through the Cult Terrace and you come to the Great Forecourt. Now im not too sure about NESW etc. so I'm gonna keep it simple. As soon as you go through the entrance (i.e. directly in front of you) you get the Second Pylon, that leads into the Great Hypostyle Hall. Now I currently have some photos of the hall and possibly all the Temple in fact, but thats a LOT of photos. I'll post the ones I planned on originally, and if people want me to then I'll post more of it. But for now It'll only be a few of the Great Forecourt, The Open Air Mueseum, and the Second Pylon, and thats it.

 

 

Photo 7 - Entrance to the Open Air Museum - on the LEFT as you come through the entrance 1

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00706.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 8 - Entrance to the Open Air Museum - on the LEFT as you come through the entrance 2

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00709.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 9 - In the Open Air Museum 1

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00711.jpg[/img]

Right this so called "Open Air Museum" actually used to be a temple, and may have been a house, amongst other things. The hieroglyphic writing on the wall meant something, but I honestly can't remember, but Ill post the photos anyway.

 

Photo 10 - In the Open Air Museum 2

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00713.jpg[/img]

 

Altars. Three of them, one for each of the deities worshiped at the time that the current pharaoh was around.

 

Photo 11 - In the Open Air Museum 3

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00714.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 12 - In the Open Air Museum 4

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00716.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 13 - In the Open Air Museum 5

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00717.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 14 - In the Open Air Museum 6

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00718.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 15 - Back in the Great Forecourt again - looking directly forward as you came in through the main entrance

[/img]

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00708.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 16 - Back in the Great Forecourt again - looking directly forward as you came in through the main entrance

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00707.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 17 - Back in the Great Forecourt again - The First Pylon, on the right side of the entrance

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00719.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 18 - Alabaster Sphinx in the Great Hall

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00720.jpg[/img]

 

Photo 19 - The Great Forecourt - Statue of Rameses (I think)

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00727.jpg[/img]

Yeah, this massive satue is at the end of the forecourt on the right, at the entrance to the Great Hypostyle Hall.

 

Photo 20 - The Great Forecourt - Statue of Rameses 2

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00724.jpg[/img]

Haha if you look carefully past the lovedovey couple posing in the photo, you can see that there is a small statue of a Queen engraved at the base of Rameses statue. I can't remember her name, but Rameses loved her, she died before him, and I think he spent the rest of his life mourning. Not male supremacy then  ;D

 

Photo 21 - The Great Forecourt - Statue

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00726.jpg[/img]

Dunno who this was, but they're opposite Rameses.

 

Photo 22 - The Great Forecourt into the Great Hypostyle Hall

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00725.jpg[/img]

Just past the statues, just before the hall.

 

Photo 23 - The Great Forecourt into the Great Hypostyle Hall

width=640 height=480http://i603.photobucket.com/albums/tt118/jgjgjg/DSC00728.jpg[/img]

Same again, but galncing up the wall to give some idea of size.

 

Phew that took ages. I'll leave it up to you guys if you want more  ;)

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>>>>>>>>>WOW<<<<<<<<<<

 

Reyoru my long lost ogier brother who has found his way home to the stedding at long last,

 

Please accept this medal as a prize for the most elaborate and complete entry to date, into the Ogier Architect's Museum! I normally only award these to non-ogier who find their way into the stedding to visit, so I hope you won't be offended at this, Ogier Brother. I simply HAD to recognize your awesome contribution! Now we know what you were doing outside the stedding for so long! I hope the longing did not sap your strength. I welcome you home!

 

silver_tree_pendant.jpg

 

 

 

OGIER ORIGIN THEORY CONNECTION!

 

Furthermore, not only did you make the most elaborate and complete entry yet, you also managed to trigger an ogier origin theory connection here in the museum!

 

You posted "Now for some reason, this is the only sphinx in the corridor, that has a pharaoh inset, rather than just the typical rams horns (although broken off). Any ideas anyone? Some Ogier interference maybe? :)"

 

For those who skipped to this page and missed my prior explanations of this, my pet theory:

 

The origins and purposes of many ancient architectures are unknown.  I think that Robert Jordan meant us to surmise that the Ogier were the builders of these ancient architectures!  By now, though, in our age, the ogier are merely legend, and we spell them wrong, ogres.

 

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Wow I'm kinda stunned lol. You honour me greatly cherise treesister and I am genuninely delighted and warmed by your praise sister :D thank you very much for actually starting this amazing museum ;) *shakes hand and massive hug*

Now for a round at the sung wood :)

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Well, I specifically used photobucket to upload the pics onto, if I do upload more, Ill post a link or edit the post above  :)

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  • 3 weeks later...

*Sigh*

 

We ogier so carefully built the "Mayan" calendar to tell the humans exactly when we would be returning to this planet, yet much of humanity thinks our calendar ends on December 21, 2012!

 

Don't they realize there is no beginning nor end to a circular calendar?

 

We ogier made the Mayan calendar out of 17 different calendar circles. Each circle has a different cycle in time. The longest cycle is 40 octillion years and the shortest cycle is 260 days. All these 17 circles fit together like cogged wheels in a mechanical clock or mill...

 

If it doesn't sound too prideful, I think we ogier did an amazing job on the Mayan calendar. Most of the humans even admit that the Mayan calendar far more accurately predicts the location of the planets and the stars than even their modern computerized calendars. I wrote a whole page about this with references and pictures so that everyone should understand. 

 

http://www.mahalo.com/is-2012-another-y2k

 

I really hope these humans read it. They are making themselves crazed with worry for nothing, some of them! That 2012 movie coming out on November 13, 2009 is not going to help much, I don't think. Maybe if other ogier post there on my page in the comment section under the movie and explain it to the people, it will help them understand? I feel responsible for making the humans understand!

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  • 1 month later...

Ok guys here goes:  :)

 

The Temples of Karnak

 

 

 

Phew that took ages. I'll leave it up to you guys if you want more  ;)

 

thx for the effort :)

i hope u liked Egypt and enjoyed ur visit

 

u typed many many things (to tell the truth i didnt go through it all, i already knew about it.. plus the places names in english differ a bit from what we actually call it in Egypt and that gives me headache :) )

 

after ur permission may i add some notes to what u have already posted?

 

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For a start they are located some 500 km south of Cairo, in Egypt. The area around Karnak was the ancient Egyptian Ipet-isut ("The Most Selected of Places") and the main place of worship of the Theban Triad with the god Amun as its head. It is part of the monumental city of Thebes. The Karnak complex takes its name from the nearby (and partly surrounded) modern village of el-Karnak, some 2.5 km north of Luxor.

El-Karnak means "the Fortified village"

 

The complex is a vast open-air museum and the largest ancient religious site in the world.

thats very true.. the Karnak complex covers about (4 fadans = 17000 m2)

 

The key difference between Karnak and most of the other temples and sites in Egypt is the length of time over which it was developed and used. Construction of temples started in the Middle Kingdom and continued through to Ptolemaic times. Approximately thirty pharaohs contributed to the buildings, enabling it to reach a size, complexity, and diversity not seen elsewhere. Few of the individual features of Karnak are unique, but the size and number of features are overwhelming.

 

it took more than 1500 years (all before AD)

actually it was built on the ruins of another ancient temples, but the approximating number of 1500 doesnt include the destroyed temple which the currently Karnak complex built over :D (in Egypt when we say its ancient .. then it REALLY ancient :) )

 

One of most famous aspects of Karnak, is the Hypostyle Hall in the Precinct of Amun-Re, a hall area of 50,000 sq ft (5,000 m2) with 134 massive columns arranged in 16 rows. 122 of these columns are 10 meters tall, and the other 12 are 21 meters tall with a diameter of over three meters. The architraves on top of these columns weigh an estimated 70 tons.

each of those huge columns tell us alot of the military history of the ancient Egypt, basically most of the pharoas greatest battles and their glorious victories on their enemies.

 

 

 

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Of course emyali, feel free.

 

My family originally come from Egypt, ahlan wa sahlan, nawarty the Org :D

 

:D

ahlan w sahlan beek

the Org menawara with you

maybe if we backed few centuries we will find a common relative or so :)

 

im delighted to visit the Ogiar museum, and look forward to contribute .. but im a novice in the white tower, hope to join the brown ajah one day =D

 

 

i'll add some other pic to ur collection.. i have to admit i didnt take them myself.. when u live in Egypt, u care more to take photos with the monuments thank just picturing it, better to go and see it on real ;) right

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Egypt_Luxor_Karnak_Temple_view_byni.jpg

3345325-Nightlife-Luxor.jpg

11520karnak20temp20at20night209.jpg

 

the sound and light project, makes the place at night much more holy, and if u have vivid imagination.. u can really feel as if u got in a time machine and transmitted 3 or 4 thousand years ago

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