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A WHEEL OF TIME COMMUNITY
Cherise

The Ogier Architect's Museum!

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Ooooo, Cherise, it's older than the 'Henge!  :)  May be it's older than the Ogier!  If I ever get back over there, I'm going to make sure that is on my itinerary. *nods*

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*looks in shock at the pendant weighing poor Jump's head down*

 

Oh dear!

 

Here, try this!

 

Amey-seaweed-tree-gold-necklace.jpg

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The Piasa or Piasa Bird is a legendary creature that was depicted in one of two murals painted by Native Americans on bluffs (cliffsides) above the Mississippi River. Its original location was at the end of a limestone bluff in Madison County, Illinois near present day Alton, Illinois. The original Piasa Bird illustration no longer exists; a newer version, based partly on 19th century sketches and lithographs, has been placed in Alton, Illinois, several hundred yards upstream from its origin. The limestone rock quality on the new site is unsuited for holding an image and thus the painting must be revived occasionally. The original site of the painting was a high quality layer of lithographic limestone that was mostly quarried away in the late 1870's by the Mississippi Lime Company.

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The ancient mural was created prior to the arrival of any European explorers in the region. It may have been an older residual iconograph from the large Native American cultural center of Cahokia. The location of the image was at the actual river bluff "gate" to the American Bottoms valley were the Cahokian mound Mississippian culture peaked. The icon of bird creatures (IE, falcons, bird men, etc) was a common motif of the Cahokia's', and the Piasa Bird images may have been a symbolic warning to strangers traveling down the Mississippi River that they were entering the fierce territory of the Mound Builders, known for human sacrifice. Since the geographic area was first historically explored and settled by Europeans of French descent, the name Piasa is likely a corruption of the Old French pronunciation Paillissa. Meaning palisade or river bluff. Thus Paillissa Bird, is simply corrupted to American English as Piasa Bird: the bird on the cliff. This is evidenced by the 1797-1798 map of French explorer Nicolas De Finiels where he clearly labels the cliffs above the Piasa Bird location as "Hauteurs De Paillisa".

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In 1673, Father Jacques Marquette discovered the painting on a limestone bluff overlooking the Mississippi River while exploring the area. He recorded the following description of his discovery:

 

"While Skirting some rocks, which by Their height and length inspired awe, We saw upon one of them two painted monsters which at first made Us afraid, and upon Which the boldest savages dare not Long rest their eyes. They are as large As a calf; they have Horns on their heads Like those of a deer, a horrible look, red eyes, a beard Like a tiger's, a face somewhat like a man's, a body Covered with scales, and so Long A tail that it winds all around the Body, passing above the head and going back between the legs, ending in a Fish's tail. Green, red, and black are the three Colors composing the Picture. Moreover, these 2 monsters are so well painted that we cannot believe that any savage is their author; for good painters in France would find it difficult to reach that place Conveniently to paint them. Here is approximately The shape of these monsters, As we have faithfully Copied It."

width=360 height=480http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc280/Samuraiflip05/100_0067.jpg[/img]

 

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:) Wow! Very interesting, Sam! I love these old almost inexplicable artifacts.

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I was going to ask you about that painting from your other pictures Sam, those are really amazing.  Its just astounding what we've lost over the years before people really tried to preserve those things. 

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Sam - never mind the painting -

 

is that your car?!!?!?!?!!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!??!!?

 

 

 

Here ya go, Kelly    :)

 

silver_tree_pendant.jpg

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You are always welcome, Mother Ogier.  =)

 

My museum addition for this week is the Bonaventure Hotel in Los Angeles.  You will probably recognize it from CSI and the hundreds of movies it has been in. Almost every time a movie is set in Los Angeles, they open with a shot of the Bonaventure. That is how distinguishing this architecture is.

 

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Here is the inside view of the bottom of one of the famous elevator shafts. These elevators go outside once they get up past this floor. I rode up in one when I was 13, and I still remember how exhilarating it was!

 

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Here is a closer view of one of the elevators when it is outside (left middle of photo).

 

width=304 height=480http://ompage.net/Convocation1999/0006bonaventureA.jpg[/img]

 

Here is the hotel's website for more interior photos. It is a five star hotel.

http://www.thebonaventure.com/

 

 

 

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:) Beautiful Cherise! 

 

My entry for this month:

 

The Anta Grande do Zambujeiro (Great Dolmen of Zambujeiro)

outside-1971-ccc-gbaku.jpg

 

dates from c.4000-3500 BC. It is the largest dolmen in Europe.

It consists of a free-standing single-chamber dolmen and was used by the Neolithic communities as a burial place and also possibly for religious purposes. The chamber, of polygonal form, is made of seven large stones that rise 8m above the ground. The entrance was marked by a large, decorated menhir, now lying on the ground.

A dolmen (also known as cromlech (Welsh), anta, Hünengrab, Hunebed, Goindol, quoit, and portal dolmen) is a type of single-chamber megalithic tomb, usually consisting of three or more upright stones supporting a large flat horizontal capstone (table). Most date from the early Neolithic period (4000 to 3000 BC). Dolmens were usually covered with earth or smaller stones to form a barrow, though in many cases that covering has weathered away, leaving only the stone "skeleton" of the burial mound intact.

antagrandedozambujeiro.jpg

The dolmen is located in a peaceful setting among olive and cork trees. The main chamber - measuring 8 meters high and 6 meters in diameter - is formed by eight standing stones leaning inward. Leading to the chamber is a 12-meter-long approach corridor made of smaller standing stones.

inside-view-from-chamber2-ccc-gbaku.jpg

The capstone has been removed by archaeologists and the artifacts that were found here are on display at the Museu de Evora.

 

Quick Facts

Names: Anta Grande do Zambujeiro; Great Dolmen of Zambujeiro

State/Province: Alentejo

Country: Portugal

Categories:  Megaliths

Faith: Prehistoric

Status: monument

Date(s): c.4000-3500 BC

Coordinates: 38.539262° N, 8.014451° W 

Cost: Free

 

Getting There

The Anta Grande do Zambujeiro is not accessible by public transportation. By car from Evora, take the N380 (Alcáçovas road) 7km southwest to the town of Valverde. From there, brown archeological signposts lead north through the university's agricultural faculty grounds to the dolmen. The last kilometer is on a dirt road that is safe for cars except sometimes after heavy rains.

 

 

 

 

Article written by Holly Hayes with reference to the following sources:

 

Anta Grande do Zambujeiro - Wikipedia (accessed April 2009)

Anta Grande do Zambujeiro - Rough Guide to Portugal, 12th edition

Lonely Planet Portugal (2007), 230.

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Wow Lor,

 

That is a truly mystifying structure!  Thanks for that! 

And you have triggered an

 

Ogier Origin Theory Alarm!

 

I believe RJ meant us to think the ogier were the builders of all the prehistoric and mysterious structures. 

 

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My museum entry for this week is Grand Canyon. Not man-made, you say? Let's see if I can find some photos online of what my husband and I saw while we were there...

 

Ok, well this skywalk is man-made for sure, and how amazingly gravity defying is it?

 

grand-canyon-skywalk.jpg

 

skywalk-grand-canyon-1.jpg

 

But that isn't what I meant to post about. Some of the structures in Grand Canyon look to be built. Maybe it was huge ogier hands that built them.

 

width=480 height=480http://www.keligo.com/giftpockets/graphics/grand-canyon-mystique-hires.jpg[/img]

 

GrandCanyon1-main_Full.jpg

 

Grand_Canyon_South_Rim_3.JPG

 

 

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That thing gives me the heebie jeebies just thinking about it. *shudders*  You could not pay me to walk out there. Nope.

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Me too!  The only reason I got a good view on a visit to the canyon, was because my kids started climbing on the guard rail at North Rim and I had to push my wife out to grab them (but she's short and I had to keep my eyes open as not to push too hard, so I got an eye full). 

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Wait, I am confused.....did you get an eyefull of "the" canyon, or "her" canyon....it's integral to the story.  ;)

 

 

Machu Picchu is an unbelievable display of stonemasonry. 

 

The central buildings of Machu Picchu use the classical Inca architectural style of polished dry-stone walls of regular shape. The Incas were masters of this technique, called ashlar, in which blocks of stone are cut to fit together tightly without mortar. The Incas were among the best stone masons the world has seen, and many junctions in the central city are so perfect that it is said not even a blade of grass fits between the stones.

 

Some Inca buildings were constructed using mortar, but by Inca standards this was quick, shoddy construction, and was not used in the building of important structures. Peru is a highly seismic land, and mortar-free construction was more earthquake-resistant than using mortar. The stones of the dry-stone walls built by the Incas can move slightly and resettle without the walls collapsing.

 

Inca walls show numerous design details that also help protect them from collapsing in an earthquake. Doors and windows are trapezoidal and tilt inward from bottom to top; corners usually are rounded; inside corners often incline slightly into the rooms; and "L"-shaped blocks often were used to tie outside corners of the structure together. These walls do not rise straight from bottom to top but are offset slightly from row to row.

 

The Incas never used the wheel in any practical manner. Its use in toys demonstrates that the principle was well-known to them, although it was not applied in their engineering. The lack of strong draft animals as well as terrain and dense vegetation issues may have rendered it impractical. How they moved and placed enormous blocks of stones remains a mystery, although the general belief is that they used hundreds of men to push the stones up inclined planes. A few of the stones still have knobs on them that could have been used to lever them into position; it is believed that after the stones were placed, the Incas would have sanded the knobs away, but a few were overlooked.

 

The space is composed of 140 structures or features, including temples, sanctuaries, parks, and residences that include houses with thatched roofs. There are more than one hundred flights of stone steps–often completely carved from a single block of granite–and a great number of water fountains that are interconnected by channels and water-drains perforated in the rock that were designed for the original irrigation system. Evidence has been found to suggest that the irrigation system was used to carry water from a holy spring to each of the houses in turn.

 

12-angle-stone.jpg

The 12 angle stone. A prime example of how tightly fit the Incan "mortarless" walls held against time.

 

PerfectWall.jpg

Incans often polished the stones once they were fit together. 

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:)  I <3 redwoods!  ;D

 

All ogier <3 redwoods!

 

(and all other trees!)

 

Seriously though, aren't they awe inspiring?!

 

----Ogier Origin Theory Alert-----

 

I believe RJ means us to imagine that ogier planted and tended the Mariposa Grove, ages ago, before the area was called Yosemite.

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