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DRAGONMOUNT

A WHEEL OF TIME COMMUNITY
Fantomboo

The Great Library

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Well I took a break from my WoT reread to finish the Night Angel trilogy. It really grew on me. Might have to buy them now :P

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*a maiden of the spear walks into the building*

 

What a great place!

 

I´m always looking out for new books to read. Lately it haven´t been much reading (except for re-reading HP) but I think when autumn comes I will start again.

 

Some of my favorites: A bruxa de Portobello (Paulo Coelho), Mort (Terry Pratchet) and Flying with dragons (Khaled Hosseini).

If someone can read Swedish I highly recommend Johanne Hildebrandt´s books about Freja, Idun and Saga. It´s to bad that they haven´t been translated into English.

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hello ogier. very nice library.

 

you probably know about this one already, but just in case - you might like to check out the bartleby project. it has an unbelievable number of public domain books online, free - and legal. a great resource for students, and people who just love reading old books.

 

http://www.bartleby.com/

 

another free project i love - the LOLcat bible translation project. my favorite bible translation. and you can add to it, if you're of a LOLspeak frame of mind.

 

http://www.lolcatbible.com/index.php?title=Main_Page

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Just picked up free books.....always the best. They are non-fiction books though. One of them should be fun though....it is The Dilbert Principle by Scott Adams.

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Where'd you get them?

I've taken advantage of Border's' going out of business sales :P

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:biggrin: Yea for the lolcat bible!

 

I just finished The Parasol Protectorate: Soulless, Blameless, Changeless, and Heartless and enjoyed them very much. Very light, well written farce, set in an alternate Victorian England where werewolves and vampires have helped make the Empire Great *lol*. It's not everyone's cup of tea, (pun intended) but very good beach reading.

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I got them from a free pile left behind by a retiring teacher where I work.

 

And yay for liquidation sales....boo that Borders is going going gone, but it is time to be like vultures.

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Mmmm... I love libraries very much so this place is really my place :biggrin: The books, the space, the people, the calmness... Awesome!

 

*a maiden of the spear walks into the building*

 

What a great place!

 

I´m always looking out for new books to read. Lately it haven´t been much reading (except for re-reading HP) but I think when autumn comes I will start again.

 

Some of my favorites: A bruxa de Portobello (Paulo Coelho), Mort (Terry Pratchet) and Flying with dragons (Khaled Hosseini).

If someone can read Swedish I highly recommend Johanne Hildebrandt´s books about Freja, Idun and Saga. It´s to bad that they haven´t been translated into English.

 

Yes, I read the Freja, Idun and Saga too. Unfortunately I don't know Swedish well enough to read them in the original language but luckily they were translated in Finnish. They are really good and I recommend them too, especially for female readers.

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Hello Ogier. The Library is beautiful. I finished my first read of Lord of Chaos earlier this week, and now I'm reading Sanderson's Elantris. I have about 120 pages remaining in that one.

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I know it has been a while sorry. I have another book to add to the library. It is called " the night circus" I enjoyed it very much. The only bad thing I have to say about it is that it jumps around a bit. Other than that it is a very intriguing story. Pic it up read it and enjoy the read :)

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Wow - it's been a while since I last went into the library.

 

Like a true Ogier, I've been reading a lot, even though I haven't been here (in fact, sometimes it's difficult to stop me :rolleyes: . Most recently, I've been changing genres a bit, and I've found two new authors to read: back to urban fantasy, with Ben Aaronovitch's Rivers of London (Midnight Riot in America), and jumping over to space/SF comedy with Toby Frost's Space Captain Smith. Both have a very British flavour, although in different ways, and I really enjoyed both of them.

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I found Dunn and Byrnes' Middle English Literature in a rummage pile and snatched it away from the undeserving. This book is an incredible anthology of English lit from the 12th to the 15th century and also briefly touches upon the Scottish Renaissance. In addition to stands like "The Pearl" and "Gawain and the Green knight," it contains some of the English wisdom literature like "The Proverbs of Alfred" and "The Sayings of Saint Bernard." If you're ever interested in this period of English lit, definitely pick up this anthology.

 

If you really loved me, you'd spot me three hundred woolong and a fistful of rupees so I could buy Pulsiano's Medieval Scandinavia. No, really. I mean it. You should know that I really do love you. Show me how much you love me and buy me this book.

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After class on Friday, I went to the library discard shop and I bought

 

- "The Last Light of the Sun" by Guy Gavriel Kay (read his Fionavar Tapestry trilogy)

- "The Knowledge of Man" - Martin Buber (I think it's safe to say I'm a student of Buber at this point)

- "The Handmaid's Tale" - Margaret Atwood (something I'm reading in class)

- "Socrates Meets Marx" - Peter Kreeft (a Socratic dialogue between Socrates and Karl Marx published by Catholic press Ignatius)

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Last weekend I read two new books. Across the Universe and A Million Suns. They are part of a series the third book has not been released yet. They are young adult not something I usually read but they were enjoyable. It is about a girls that gets frozen along with her patents to enhabit a new earth. They are suppose to stay frozen until they get there in 300 years but she gets woke up early to a very different world on the space craft. It is told in two view points one the girl and the other a boy called Elder. I recommend this for light reading.

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Just picked up Jack of Ravens by Mark Chadbourn, and I'm thoroughly enjoying it so far. It's not every day that I discover modern fantasy/speculative fiction set in modern Britain (Harry Potter notwithstanding - I haven't read any of the boy wizard's tales), so it's good to immerse myself in this dark world again. It's good to see a return of the characters from the first trilogy (Age of Misrule), too, as well as the addition of several new Brothers and Sisters of Dragons. It took me ages to track down a decent copy, and I'm hoping to have as much luck finding the next two in the series!

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Alright, kids. It's time to help and old man out.

 

For my final project (call it a senior thesis, if you will) before graduation, I am doing an independent study on social structure found in science fiction. I need some deep, well-written, socially-minded sci-fi novels to read and reference. I have had a few come to mind, but sci-fi is not really my forte. Anyone care to help?

 

If I do this well, it gets published. It's 40 pages of writing and thousands of pages of reading all due in early July, so I need to start now.

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Hmm... I wish I could help, but my realm of expertise with SF is more or less limited to tv sci-fi. The only SF books I've read were The Ship who Sang and the Crystal Singer trilogy by Anne McCaffrey. I'll have a think, and see if I can come up with anything else. Good luck!

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Well, the first one that comes to mind in terms of being socially-minded is Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. A little-known fact is that in the title is taken from the temperature at which paper burns, and this is mentioned in the book... but in real life, paper burns at 451 degrees Celsius.

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Alright, kids. It's time to help and old man out.

 

For my final project (call it a senior thesis, if you will) before graduation, I am doing an independent study on social structure found in science fiction. I need some deep, well-written, socially-minded sci-fi novels to read and reference. I have had a few come to mind, but sci-fi is not really my forte. Anyone care to help?

 

If I do this well, it gets published. It's 40 pages of writing and thousands of pages of reading all due in early July, so I need to start now.

 

I have this anthology in storage somewhere and it's been years since I've read it but I remember it having some relevant stories.

 

Sociology Through Science Fiction

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Read "Project Pope" by Clifford D. Simak. Great book about robots living on a planet and religion. I have few others to recommend just not the time today. Will get a list for you over the next few days.

 

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My list thus far (tentative)

 

Brave New World - Aldous Huxley

Enders Game - Orson Scott Card

Spin - Robert Charles Wilson

Stand on Zanzibar - John Brunner

Stranger in a Strange Land - Robert Heinlein

The Death of Grass - John Christopher

The Left Hand of Darkness - Ursula Le Guin

The Mote in Gods Eye - Larry Niven

Bable 17 - Samuel Delany

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A member of the ACW Guild was asking about books illustrative of historical costumes. I found three very good ones which I would like to share with you.

 

 

 

They can be found at Barnes & Noble.

 

 

"Costume

1066 to the present"

Peacock, John

ISBN 0-500-28602-7

 

The next one is a beautiful book, suitable for coffee table, really lovely:

 

"Fashion, Illustration and Graphic Design

George Barbier

Master of Art Deco"

Unno, Hiroshi

ISBN 978-4-7562-4144-3

 

 

"Fashion

A Visual History from Regency & Romance to Retro & Revolution"

Stevenson, NJ

ISBN 978-0-312-62445-3

 

HTH

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