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Liitha

Strong female rollemodels

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Ok so let's share some good rolle models be it females out there in RL or well made fictional characters in books movies the like.

 

 

They don't need to be world famous ...give a cry out to those who try make a difference or share of themselves that may be less known too

 

Example I just started following a new youtube blogger or what they called, she is struggling with depression and shareing this and how she is working on getting better...and this is so important because as she say in the video not everyone have all options avaliable...

 

 

 

 

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Laverne Cox

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This woman is tha bomb! Like seriously she is beautiful inside and out. She's a openly transgender woman that is both an outstanding actress (orange is the new black ++) and a emmy awarded documentary film producer. She is also the first transgender woman on the cover of cosmopolitan and being made a wax statue of in madam tussaud's museum. And with good reason, cause she is also a strong voice in the fight for lgbt+ rights.

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Greta Thunberg is one woman who currently springs to mind. I find it especially interesting because she's so young - it ties in with our Wonder Girls from the Wheel of Time.

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Hear hear mother!!!  that girl got backbones like a north atlantic right whale *nods*

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I follow some geek culture, specifically the D&D kind, casually. (Though one specifically with some reverence). 

A woman named Andrea Towers wrote this AMAZING book that features a cast of characters inspired by strong women, and what we can take away from them. It's very good book and I highly recommend it. It's called Geek Girls Don't Cry: Real-Life Lessons From Fictional Female Characters. 

(link: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/1454933399/?coliid=I3LAB8YIO3OV6G&colid=32U0KIPSD3Q87&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it )

 

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Added sample to kindle will look at it when my head returns 😉

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I was watching an interesting program this weekend called "The American Experience: The Vote Part 1", and this particular episode was about women's suffrage and obtaining the right to vote in the US. I think many of the women involved in the movement are role models ❤️.

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Captain Marvel. But really, Carol Danvers. And there's an important reason I make the distinction.

Captain Marvel: The Many Careers of Carol Danvers | Den of Geek

No, Carol Danvers is not real. But she's still really cool, and she'd be a powerful figure even if she hadn't had superpowers. Her movie took on a much more nuanced view of feminism than Wonder Woman, whose namesake character was famous for saying that she believed in love, while Carol Danvers had a more fuck-all approach (I looked it up; you can say that in a pg-13 setting as long as it's not in a sexual context) that taught girls (including myself) that self-confidence is more important than recognition. Danvers doesn't try to appeal to those in power to try to get what she wants; she knows she's good enough, and those of her superiors who aren't portrayed as douches realize her worth as a person before they learn how powerful she is. Carol's central arc in the movie isn't your traditional superhero story, like learning how to use her superpowers or trying to keep her secret identity hidden -- it's about realizing that she is stable, powerful, and self-reliant, and doesn't need other people to hold her hand, while still recognizing that it's okay to take help as long as the people offering have your best interests at heart. The emotional climax of the story happens when she tells her long-time mentor (but really captor) that she has nothing to prove to him. The scene right after it, where she takes down a whole fleet of alien spaceships with her superpowers, is really a part of the falling action, so the lesson is not that women are important only if they're special in a way they can't control (this is actually one of the mistakes that the Mulan live action adaptation made by making Mulan a prodigy, and concluding her less-talented sister's arc with a marriage, implying that this was the best she could do), but that women should stand up for themselves and that equal opportunity is more important than exceptionalism. Wonder Woman, along with making Mulan 2020's mistakes, also played into common biases about women -- the line "I believe in love" epitomizes women in their role as motherly and affectionate, which, while not directly related to, contributes greatly to the homemaker stereotype. Wonder Woman did make strides; the way it reversed the gender roles in the romance, for example, so that the man was the one who was constantly making ignorant mistakes and being rescued, was humorous and proved a couple of the finer points about sexism in relationship-building, but Captain Marvel took another step toward gender equality, especially in terms of perception of social issues.

To conclude, Carol Danvers is a brilliant woman and character who was used expertly by the writers to prove a nuanced point and address pervasive women's issues.

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@PiedPiper I love your post! Excellent and thought provoking points.

Also, love that TP quote 🥰

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On 9/27/2020 at 11:57 PM, Phaedra said:

I was watching an interesting program this weekend called "The American Experience: The Vote Part 1", and this particular episode was about women's suffrage and obtaining the right to vote in the US. I think many of the women involved in the movement are role models ❤️.

Sounds interesting, where did you see this? Is it on Netflix? 

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US channel PBS. The link in my post goes directly to the episode so you can watch it online. Hopefully it works outside the US!

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Probably wont.. 😃 sounded interesting though you should totally give a rewiev if there's a part 2 !

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YcUB0TZ.jpg

 

This thread would be remiss if it did not include in it’s Hall of Honors the formidable Ruth Bader Ginsburg, also known as the Notorious R.B.G. She served on the United States Supreme Court from 1993 until her death from pancreatic cancer in September 2020. She was a staunch supporter of gender equality, for both women and men, as well as equality for all in general. Some of her notable cases and dissents include:

 

Before the Supreme Court:

 

RBG argued hundreds of gender discrimination cases early in her career, 6 of which went to the Supreme Court (she won 5 of the 6). She made efforts to show that gender discrimination affected men, as well as women, though the fact remains there is a disproportionate amount of female cases.

 

Moritz v. Commissioner – argued for a man to receive caregiver deductions, just like a woman would receive.

 

 Frontiero v. Richardson411 U.S. 677 – argued a female service member should be allowed to claim increased housing for her husband, just like a male service member can for his wife.

 

Weinberger v. Wiesenfeld420 U.S – argued widowers are entitled to special benefits when raising minor children, just like what widows receive.

 

While on the Supreme Court:

 

Ledbetter v. Goodyear550 U.S – This lawsuit was brought by a woman who was not receiving equal pay with her male counterparts. The court ruled against the defendant, stating the statute of limitations had run out as the clock started from the first paycheck…not when she found out she was getting paid less. RBG dissented the ruling as being absurd, because employees don’t usually find out they are getting paid less until many years into employment. Her dissent lead to the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which makes it easier for employees to sue regarding unfair pay practices.

 

Olmstead v. L.Cruling mental illness is a disability, therefor protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

 

Supported Same-Sex Marriage, and it is believed she is the first Justice to perform a same-sex marriage ceremony.

 

Supported the Me-Too movement, stating “It's about time. For so long women were silent, thinking there was nothing you could do about it, but now the law is on the side of women, or men, who encounter harassment and that's a good thing."

 

On women’s abortion rights: “"[t]he basic thing is that the government has no business making that choice for a woman."

 

RBG wrote a fiery dissent regarding  Shelby County v. Holder, as the case made the federal preclearance portion of the Voting Rights Act unconstitutional. She stated “Throwing out preclearance when it has worked and is continuing to work to stop discriminatory changes is like throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet.” This dissent earned her the moniker The Notorious R.B.G.

 

Ginsburg received many honors in her lifetime for her advocacy and work with gender equality. She was a beloved Justice, not with only her peers, but with the public as well. She was an inspiration to many, and her loss to cancer is deeply felt nationwide. She served with passion and dedication, and I’m sure if she were a member of DM, she’d definitely be a Red.

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I do agree that RBG is a great woman. However, she made one crucial mistake for which I have a hard time forgiving her: she didn't retire when Obama was in office.

When I say this to people, many of them ask why she should step down.

 

1) Politics is like a pendulum; the farther it swings to one side of the political spectrum, the farther it'll swing to the other side in the next election cycle (with the notable exception that presidents are almost always re-elected). Ginsburg, as a very intelligent person who is surely very much in the know regarding the political landscape, had to be aware that, in reaction to our first black president, the country would swing far right after Obama.

2) Ginsburg was very old even when Obama took office. Who knew how long she would have lasted? She should have retired around midway through Obama's first term, when he had the House and the Senate and could have gotten a liberal candidate confirmed in her place. Instead she, out of what I assume to be ego, kept her place and left the rest of us to pray that she'd make it through Trump's presidency.

 

Tragically but unsurprisingly, she didn't.

Now Donald Trump is going to place a judge on the Supreme Court of the United States, a lifetime appointment -- and his nominee is young and healthy, and has beliefs completely in opposition to those of Justice Ginsberg. If RBG had really though about protecting the interests of her country, she would have retired eight years ago.

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Young and upcomming:

Savannah aka queer kiwi, a young, queer feminist who dares to raise questions about important societal issues that affect us all (yes men too), even against her "own people".

I think she can speak best for herself.

 

Edited by Lavandula

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I get you, Pied Piper. That was certainly a misstep (understatement, I know) on her part. And you aren't the first person I've heard use the pendulum analogy regarding politics, of which I tend to agree. I think our society as a whole is fairly middle of the road, but when things head toward the edges, things do get off kilter, and people react accordingly. 

 

For me, I appreciated the things RBG accomplished in her lifetime, and felt she is worthy of being a strong, female role model, even despite poor judgement there at the end.

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1 hour ago, Phaedra said:

For me, I appreciated the things RBG accomplished in her lifetime, and felt she is worthy of being a strong, female role model, even despite poor judgement there at the end.

I think you do have a point there -- regardless of the political issues she's caused, she's still a great feminist role model. Maybe the important thing is to separate her role as a powerful female icon from her role as a judge. A complicated thing, because they're so intertwined, but necessary, I think, in order to revere her memory without condoning the mistakes she made.

 

The hardest part about this, for me, is that she was so brilliant. I've read some of the cases she argued and some of the opinions she wrote, and sometimes she just rocks my world.

Edited by PiedPiper

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