Jump to content

DRAGONMOUNT

A WHEEL OF TIME COMMUNITY
Mashiara Sedai

May Discussion: Favorite Non-Fiction Books

Recommended Posts

Halfway through the month, but I'm feeling motivated, so I'm jumping on it!

 

I'm not one to read non-fiction.  So, I thought it would be an interesting avenue to explore. 


The last non-fiction book I read was "Teaching Like a Champion," a book that gives helpful hints on how to manage a classroom.  It was actually really great, and as a first-year teacher, I really needed all the help I could get.

 

Other non-fiction books I've read include "What I Talk About When I Talk About Running" by Haruki Murakami.  He's a Japanese novelist who decided he needed to stay active since he was spending so much time writing.  He shares how he learned to love running and now competes in triathlons!  It was an amazing read!

 

What non-fiction books have you read?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I read non-fiction outside of my textbooks and spiritual books. 

 

Oh, wait! There is one. The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman. Everyone has a language that makes them feel loved. The five languages are Words of Affirmation, Quality Time, Receiving Gifts, Acts of Service, and Physical Touch. It's a really good book that teaches you how to make your loved ones feel loved. My language is Acts of Service. Nothing makes me feel more loved than when someone does something for me, even if it is as simple as running to McDonald's. The book is geared towards couples, but I find it applies to my children, too. There is also one for parents to learn to make their kids feel loved, too, and some others. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed The Five Love Languages as well, Lily. 

 

Non-Fiction books that I can see from my chair:

 

A Walk in the Woods, by Bill Bryson. Bryon is hands-down my favorite non-fiction writer, and this is my favorite one of his. Bryson, an overweight middle-aged man, decides it might be interesting to hike the Appalachian Trail, all 2500 miles of it. Along the way, he meets fascinating characters, learns plenty about himself, and sprinkles his stories with science and history and politics. He tells it all in a gentle, thoughtful, occasionally biting style that leaves me in stitches.

 

The Obstacle is the Way - Ryan Holiday. An approachable beginning to Stoicism and how to turn challenges and failures to our advantage. 

 

A Random Walk Down Wall Street - Burton Malkiel. A bit heavy on figures and graphs, but Malkiel makes a compelling case that going it on our own when investing in the market is for suckers. Put your money on an autopilot program into index funds and you'll come out ahead more often than not. It's not as sexy as chasing winners, but it's safer and more rewarding.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh I at times throughout life gone into periods where I like reading stories from real life, be it short stories, movies or books.

 

of course there my curiculum books and other books related to studies I taken I volunteeringly read thats not on curiculumn

 

But to mention some books not from school related stuff:

Not without my daugther, princess (jean sasson its the first book in a series), I hope they serve beer in hell (tucker max), I know I read some books on people loosing children (dont recal titles), never have your dog stuffed (allan alda) and more of other types I cant recal titles of off the bat of my head.

 

I also read semifictional ones, where there is a mix of fictional main characters with references to real life events and people, and where the authors go a bit beyond just writing to make a good story in researching historic period and geting things somewhat rigth in how it would have been. Among these I know many here read earths childrean which takes you way way back, but also books like the last concubine which is set in japan 1861 are type books I will pick up for history interest and diging into topics. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband is currently reading Dianetics by L Ron Hubbard and I'm kinda tempted to read it after he's done.  

 

This is a kinda funny story... while visiting LA for the TCM Film Festival last year, the Scientology temple is right next to one of the theaters.  We stopped in to check it out and they showed us a movie about how L Ron Hubbard wrote Dianetics.  While I do not agree with Scientology philosophy--I identify as an atheist--the book Dianetics did sound interesting.  I'm intrigued by mental health, since I have my own mental health issues and have been seeing a therapist for the past two years, and I'd love to look at different ways on how the brain processes information, feelings, memories, etc.

 

So, since non-fiction is difficult for me to read, we'll see if I can actually get to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...