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WOT needs lavishly decorated interior/exterior spaces, halls, rooms.


Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg has jaw-dropping rooms, they can do many interior shoots there.
the Royal Palace of Caserta
The Royal Albert Hall
Neues Rathaus, Hannover https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Neues_Rathaus_Hannover,_Innenansicht.jpg
Montreal City Hall
St. Stephen's Basilica, Budapest https://travelpast50.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/transept-saint-stephen-budapest.jpg
Doge's Palace, Venice (Courtyard)
Doge's Palace, Genoa
Vatican
Moszna Castle, Poland
Nordkirchen Castle
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna
The main reading room of the Library of Congress, Washington
Thomas Jefferson Building
The United States Capitol rotunda
Ludwigsburg Palace
Union Station Washington DC
Arlington National Cemetery Amphitheather
Cour Carrée
Place des Vosges ("corridors")
Hôtel de Sully
The Denon Wing of the Louvre Museum
L’église Saint-Eustache
etc


What buildings would you like to see in the adaptation?

Edited by szilard

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The Neues Rathaus is exactly how I imagine the White Tower to look inside!

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La Sagrada Familia - looks like something Ogier-built. :P The Spanish steps in Rome, maybe as the "entrance" to the White tower?

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22 hours ago, Elgee said:

The Neues Rathaus is exactly how I imagine the White Tower to look inside!

 

It really looks stunning.

 

I think it is cheaper to filming in real sites, just drop at them a little cgi, and voilà, we have the 'perfect' result. We only need small portions from each building to create a good enough illusion.

 

19 hours ago, OlwenaSedai said:

La Sagrada Familia - looks like something Ogier-built. :P The Spanish steps in Rome, maybe as the "entrance" to the White tower?

 

That's what I'm talking about. Using a bit from here, then mix it up with another bit from there.

 

TVs do things like this all the time, for example when Rowan Atkinson took a walk in Maigret (which is a terrible series - I have only wathced a few minutes from it: where is my Jean Gabin?!), as a Hungarian it was so funny to see him walking at least 6-8 different locations with just a few steps. :smile:

 

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There's a lot or architecture in Barcelona that looks very Ogier built. It's like I imagine Tar Valon would look like.

 

The Fish Market, maybe?

4fd6c21e48dd082f7384092cac7419af--barcel

 

 

There's another Spanish architect who designs absolutely amazing, what I call "Ogier dwellings". I posted about it in this thread some time ago, but you can also look it up directly here.

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It's actually cheaper to do CGI. They film the MCU movies in a giant soundstage/film complex just south of Atlanta. I've seen it (well, the exterior of it) when I've been down there to visit my parents. But they might use real-world locations as inspiration. 

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althor+farm.jpg

 

Al'thor Farm and the Mountains of Mist. Yeah the mountains are to close but Narg can live with that. Chuck some thatch on the roof and it's good to go!

Edited by wheeloftimetv

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Dr who does a lot of location filming in old iron curtain countries because it's easier to find medieval or ancient looking places. Any modern locations would have anachronisms all over the place.

 

theres always New Zealand. Seems to have everything.

Edited by Mrs. Cindy Gill

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21 hours ago, JenniferL said:

It's actually cheaper to do CGI. They film the MCU movies in a giant soundstage/film complex just south of Atlanta. I've seen it (well, the exterior of it) when I've been down there to visit my parents. But they might use real-world locations as inspiration. 

 

MCU movies are bad examples: they look so 'green screened'. Even kids says that the effects in the latest comic book/SW movies (budget 180-230 million) were embarrassing to watch.

15 hours ago, Mrs. Cindy Gill said:

Dr who does a lot of location filming in old iron curtain countries because it's easier to find medieval or ancient looking places.

 

That's why everybody likes Budapest: you could film anything up to 1980-1990, because the city looks like ****. Zero renovation, crumbling buildings etc.

 

15 hours ago, Mrs. Cindy Gill said:

Any modern locations would have anachronisms all over the place.

 

It depends on the crew: interiors could be very well used for special things with a little modification. Sometimes modification/interpreting is everything.

Edited by szilard

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Flying the cast and crew to some of those spots and getting permission not only to use it but to shut it down for filming can be difficult.  And imo not usually worth it except to the cast and crew and very picky viewers.

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On 1/26/2018 at 11:26 PM, Mrs. Cindy Gill said:

Flying the cast and crew to some of those spots and getting permission not only to use it but to shut it down for filming can be difficult.  And imo not usually worth it except to the cast and crew and very picky viewers.

 

Quality costs money, high quality saves money.

 

You are right, but as I hear GOT uses the whole planet to film scenes. (As a non-viewer I cannot comment on their locations, sets etc.)

 

Do we want cities with 20 inhabitants, do we want armies with same 20 extras?

 

Of course, they can film the series in a parking lot, using green screens and cheap CGI, but what I hear from my friends that they have enough of these ultra cheap (or ultra cheap looking) series like Vikings, Knightfall or whatever their names. I don't know these series, after seeing a few yt videos, I'm not impressed at all.

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Pretty sure GoT kinda money isn't in play but who knows.

 

I'd rather see resources put into scripts and actors and such, and I don't think studio filming or filming at locations that aren't prohibitively expensive hurts quality at all, but I also don't think I'll see any production in my lifetime so meh. Have your Taj Mahal. 

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21 hours ago, Mrs. Cindy Gill said:

Pretty sure GoT kinda money isn't in play but who knows.

 

I'd rather see resources put into scripts and actors and such, and I don't think studio filming or filming at locations that aren't prohibitively expensive hurts quality at all, but I also don't think I'll see any production in my lifetime so meh. Have your Taj Mahal. 

 

Seeing the so-called scripts of series/movies, I do not think that we can talk about quality anymore...

 

If you compare let's say 1967 (Belle de Jour, Cool Hand Luke, The Dirty Dozen, Hombre, In the Heat of the Night, Csillagosok, katonák, Le Samouraï, Les Aventuriers, To Sir with Love, and even Wait Until Dark, because at a certain point everybody screams!) with 2017 (0)...

 

Or the so-called golden age of television (you know, groundbreaking tv series in every corner!), when people do not remember series from 1-2 years before...

 

Talking about 'actors': even the most die-hard fans of GOT say that they are passable at best. Of course they were able to 'blackmail' the producers to get more money for the last seasons.
 

By the way, they can do a Shakesperian adaptation (no sets, lavish costumes, ACTORS), sure, do it, but you need real(=good) actors for that.

 

Taj Mahal, Taj Mahal...    WOT is incompatible with cheap solutions, and I hear the laments of my friends, collegues that most fantasy series look so cheap, their quality is so bad...

 

 

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On 1/25/2018 at 7:41 PM, wheeloftimetv said:

althor+farm.jpg

 

Al'thor Farm and the Mountains of Mist. Yeah the mountains are to close but Narg can live with that. Chuck some thatch on the roof and it's good to go!

 

Definitely! That'll probably be an exterior set though, but this has a great look for 2 rivers. 

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