Aiel Heart

The Warder Field Trip

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I just look too damn sexy in armor than I would in some AS robes or whatever they wear. 

 

 

 

 

 

I thought that Warders were BA in the books simply because of the brass pair they have. They are protectors against impossible forces. I also think I would make a terrible AS. That power would be so abused lol. I was a loooooooong time lurker too and it took me some time to find a place I was comfortable interacting with. When I got to reading all of the descriptions I first chose Me'A. After some time of activity I was asked if I could step in and take charge of the Cuen as they were without a head and were in need of a makeover of sorts.. Sure! Why not?! And i am so glad I did. Me'A was great! but becoming more involved with the Cuen was the right thing for me. Being able to help influence it's new identity was an honor. Even more so that I get to see more people say such wonderful things as Myra and Kronos about the Cuen. Kronos was a huge aid in the effort as well. Cuen is as much him as he is a member of it. 

Edited by Millon

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I just look too damn sexy in armor than I would in some AS robes or whatever they wear. 

 

 

 

 

 

I thought that Warders were BA in the books simply because of the brass pair they have. They are protectors against impossible forces. I also think I would make a terrible AS. That power would be so abused lol. I was a loooooooong time lurker too and it took me some time to find a place I was comfortable interacting with. When I got to reading all of the descriptions I first chose Me'A. After some time of activity I was asked if I could step in and take charge of the Cuen as they were without a head and were in need of a makeover of sorts.. Sure! Why not?! And i am so glad I did. Me'A was great! but becoming more involved with the Cuen was the right thing for me. Being able to help influence it's new identity was an honor. Even more so that I get to see more people say such wonderful things as Myra and Kronos about the Cuen. Kronos was a huge aid in the effort as well. Cuen is as much him as he is a member of it. 

 

*blushes*

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Because I'd be a bad Aes Sedai as well and Lan was pretty much my favorite character in the books.  The character and requirements that warders were expected to have always appealed to me.  There was really no choice for me.  I joined the white tower with warders already in mind. 

 

Also that idea that we hop around and make sure everyone is being taken care of and that we help with the events...in a way I have to agree with JB, I always love playing the support role in games and what-knot.  I supposed if you think in terms of that 5 love languages, I've always thought service was the most worth while and I believe the warders embody that. 

 

Lastly, we're a bunch of goof balls and know how to have a good time and we bring the party to the Aes Sedai!  I mean, really, would they really be having as much fun without us?

Edited by thehumantrashcan

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After what I've been reading here? Definately not.

The Warders seem to be a fun group to hang out. I'm not sure how I'd do in a support role though - I'm more of a leader kind of person. I'm glad that I've still got time to decide which path to choose.

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Throughout the RJ novels, Warders appealed to me more than other groups.

 

This may sound strange--it sounds strange when I say it--but I've always wanted to be a sidekick. My first experience with this was watching Star Wars when I was 9 years old, and the character I liked the most was Chewbacca. Han Solo was the guy in charge of their duo, but Han would have had a short life if not for Chewie watching his back. The story supposedly went that Han saved Chewie from an Imperial prison, so the Wookie swore a life debt to him.

 

When I was a teenager I wanted to swear a life debt to my best friend.

 

There have been other terrific characters like that. Samwise Gamgee to Frodo Baggins. Binabik to Simon Snowlock. Robin to Batman.

 

Today, I'm still the same. I'm a terrible leader, be it in work or in social activities, but I feel most comfortable being the trusted Lieutenant, the capable Right-Hand Man, the one who plays the supporting role to the central figure.

 

So in the Wheel of Time, Warders support their Aes Sedai, and in the bargain they gain kick-ass fighting skills, quick healing abilities, and a color-shifting cloak, all things that would come very handy in real life.

 

You left out Sherlock and Watson, Harry and Ron/Hermione, Megamind and Minion :P

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I seriously doubt you'd find us to be lacking a leadership capacity, we just aren't the front men/women. 

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Okay, I am checking in on my field trip tour as an aspie! I don't really understand if I should post just in this one, or in threads for each discipline, but still :)

 

I always liked the Warders of the book, wish we got to know them a bit better. There was always so much focus on them being strong and agile, but we never learnt much about their thinking and motivations, except in some of Gawyn's chapter and certain parts with Lan. 

 

They do have a very special relationship with their Aes Sedai, but also with each other. They are often viewed with the same reverence AND fear as the AS, and don't really have any social contacts outside their own groups. Some of the AS only see them as tools and not as equals, which I find sad. 

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I never thought about it but now that you mention it, Olwena, you're quite right! I agree with Ahmyra that it's very sad - would love to have read more from the POV of a Warder.

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I think that the Warders in the books are very much more than just support for their AS. I know that the Warders here are more than just support for their AS. There is the portion that is shielding them from the harms that they might not otherwise be able to avoid due to the restraints of the tree oaths. The Warders contribute more than just the obvious if you look a little deeper. Even the "snooty" AS that think of their warders as a jumped-up bodyguard/valet have a bit more respect for them than they show to the outside world. Possibly even more than they try to show the warder themselves due to trying to maintain AS mystery or sommat. 

 

I think that the inspiration for why men (and women) decided to become warders is as individual as the people themselves. It might be something as simple as wanting to be like someone in a legend or just to be one of the baddest folks around. It might be that they share deeply in one of the main causes that their AS espouses. It could be for any number of reasons. It would be "nice" to know more about more of them but you really can't get every tidbit of backstory and hope to have the main stories move along at any sort of pace. 

 

I think that they tend to hang around the other warders as they don't have as much in common with any other group. They are not actually soldiers although they train in combat a fair amount. They are more akin to the Rangers in LotR in that they maintain their physical strength longer in life and are generally stronger and more capable to start with and then are given additional benefits of endurance and other perks. On top of that they share the type of existence.

 

They don't have sports teams to share with more "regular" folks.  

 

 

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