Elgee

So how smart should a child be at 2 years?

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I think as most of you know, I'm not overly knowledgeable about babies. I'm not interested in most of them, so I don't care. My boss's baby is quite fascinating to me (in small dosages!), though. It really seems to me that the child is quite advanced, when I compare her to others of her age or older. She's 2 years and 3 months old now, can count to 20, knows her ABC, shapes & colours, does puzzles for 4 year olds, etc. 

This weekend her mother went shopping with her. She was sitting in the shopping trolley and her mom bumped it so hard against the side of the ramp instead of going up the middle of it that the child actually fell over in the trolley. She sat back upright, gave her mum a look, and said: Would you like to try that again? (She uses words like that - better than some adults I know!). Is this normal for a child that age? The humour and the sarcasm? She wasn't even 2 years old when she started teasing her mom by calling her "daddy". Then laughing her head off, clearly understanding the joke she's making.

She knows that when they open the front door to go to the car, she's not allowed to run around. She told me very seriously, "Evie not allowed onna pavement - must stay onna lawn." (Her language has improved in the past 2 months - it's now "on the", not "onna".

Edited by Elgee

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Ummm......Not sure. I'm with you about not being too interested with babies and/or young children though.

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I don't know whether or not I am a reference lol but my three girls could sing their ABC songs, count in french and in english and recognize colours and shapes before they entered the school (which starts at 2 and a half here) :tongue: They were even coordinating colors while trying to plan their own clothes. They had also that very nasty habit to shrug and sometimes answered things that they weren't supposed to answer at their young age. I think kids are very good at listening some things.... lolololol

 

My last one is 4 and she can already write... which means that she can type, and already google Youtube on the family PC to play Disney songs >.<

 

That little girl looks adorable though. I'd love to read what she'll do in a couple of years !

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Uh, my son will be 2 in May and can't do any of those things... And I thought he was so smart *laughs nervously*

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That is hilarious! Someone clearly has learned sarcasm from mom/dad.

 

I apologize if I get a little bit shrinky right now. I think a child's perceived advancement is dependent on culture, parenting, older siblings, and other factors. Kids absorb pretty much anything in information. If they live in a household where more than one language is spoken, they'll learn both at differing rates. Example, if English is prominently spoken over French, English is learned faster. If kids are exposed to more stimuli of the same category, it'll help them make connections between them. Each child also advances at their own pace. Some kids like to learn everything and some are more interested in things they already know. My mom runs a day home so I've seen lots of kids over the years and watch them grow. Interacting with other kids also can have a positive influence on their development.

 

My brother was more "advanced" than his classmates by the time he went to Kindergarden (age 5) because I was already in school for a few years and he wanted to know what I was learning. It got to the point where my parents had to tell me to stop teaching him because he was getting bored in class due to how far ahead of everyone was and at the time the school didn't know how to adjust for him.

 

 

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12 hours ago, Adella said:

Uh, my son will be 2 in May and can't do any of those things... And I thought he was so smart *laughs nervously*

 

Boys need more time to reach the finish line and they will. They are more interested in movement and destruction.

 

By the way, I somehow let my oldest take a dive out of the cart and he hit his head on the floor at the grocery store. He's 27 and is a Network Support Engineer and moving into software development. He's 27.

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8 hours ago, Lessa Nikia said:

That is hilarious! Someone clearly has learned sarcasm from mom/dad.

 

I apologize if I get a little bit shrinky right now. I think a child's perceived advancement is dependent on culture, parenting, older siblings, and other factors. Kids absorb pretty much anything in information. If they live in a household where more than one language is spoken, they'll learn both at differing rates. Example, if English is prominently spoken over French, English is learned faster. If kids are exposed to more stimuli of the same category, it'll help them make connections between them. Each child also advances at their own pace. Some kids like to learn everything and some are more interested in things they already know. My mom runs a day home so I've seen lots of kids over the years and watch them grow. Interacting with other kids also can have a positive influence on their development.

 

My brother was more "advanced" than his classmates by the time he went to Kindergarden (age 5) because I was already in school for a few years and he wanted to know what I was learning. It got to the point where my parents had to tell me to stop teaching him because he was getting bored in class due to how far ahead of everyone was and at the time the school didn't know how to adjust for him.

 

 

 

One of the Program Managers at my job is Hispanic as is his wife. They both spoke Spanish and English to all of their children but had to stop with one because he began speaking Spanglish.

 

 

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Thank you, guys!

 

Lessa, I really appreciate all of that information!

 

I laughed at the child today again. Her latest is "Mommy, would you like to ...", as in "Mommy, would you like to pour me some water?"

Precocious :P

 

I just don't know where she gets her brains from - both parents are dumb as rocks. Seriously. Though mom was a teacher, and seems to instinctively teach her all the time. That's really wonderful to watch.

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10 hours ago, Ryrin said:

 

One of the Program Managers at my job is Hispanic as is his wife. They both spoke Spanish and English to all of their children but had to stop with one because he began speaking Spanglish.

 

That can happen as well but I don't know how common it occurs. It's unfortunate they had to stop.

 

No problem Mother :laugh: Really glad I took that Child Development Psychology class when I was in university

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9 hours ago, Lessa Nikia said:

That can happen as well but I don't know how common it occurs. It's unfortunate they had to stop.

 

No problem Mother :laugh: Really glad I took that Child Development Psychology class when I was in university

 

Oh, they waited but started again!

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23 hours ago, Ryrin said:

 

Boys need more time to reach the finish line and they will. They are more interested in movement and destruction.

 

By the way, I somehow let my oldest take a dive out of the cart and he hit his head on the floor at the grocery store. He's 27 and is a Network Support Engineer and moving into software development. He's 27.

He is definitely interested in movement and destruction LOL! He is my little monkey, right now I'm unemployed and staying home with him until I start my new job. I spend all day with this cute little boy climbing all over me. I love him, but I'm kind of tired of being touched.

 

I'm really not concerned at all about development, he was premature and still met every developmental milestone on time. I have no reason to worry. As a first time parent, that is my mantra so I don't freak out over the small stuff.

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My oldest wasn't that advanced but my 2 year old knows her colors, most shapes, counts to 10 and knows most of her abc's but she talks and jokes just like your boss's daughter.  It all depends.  It's quite fascinating.  My cousin's son was just as advanced if not more so as your boss's daughter and he is moving along at an almost genius level.

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My grandson is 13 months and is very verbal. He has twice the vocabulary that he "should" at his age. Maybe more. And they are understandable words. In other areas he is doing okay, but not advanced. He is also interested in movement and destruction. And getting into absolutely everything that isn't his. Adella, my daughter feels your pain. 

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On 1/9/2018 at 11:02 PM, Adella said:

He is definitely interested in movement and destruction LOL! He is my little monkey, right now I'm unemployed and staying home with him until I start my new job. I spend all day with this cute little boy climbing all over me. I love him, but I'm kind of tired of being touched.

 

I'm really not concerned at all about development, he was premature and still met every developmental milestone on time. I have no reason to worry. As a first time parent, that is my mantra so I don't freak out over the small stuff.

 

My oldest was born 6 weeks early and my youngest 10 weeks early.

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